Go Back   Science Forums Biology Forum Molecular Biology Forum Physics Chemistry Forum > Molecular Research Topics Forum > Animal and Molecular Model Systems > Yeast Forum
Register Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Yeast Forum Discuss research on yeast the model organism. Post questions and topics on the molecular biology and genetics of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and other yeast species.


Yeast - in food questions about

Yeast - in food questions about - Yeast Forum

Yeast - in food questions about - Discuss research on yeast the model organism. Post questions and topics on the molecular biology and genetics of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and other yeast species.


Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 07-02-2008, 12:10 AM
Pipette Filler
Points: 424, Level: 8 Points: 424, Level: 8 Points: 424, Level: 8
Activity: 0% Activity: 0% Activity: 0%
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Posts: 3
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Default Yeast - in food questions about



I am not a microbiologist, but I know someone will understand my simple and possibly dum questions. I am allergic to brewers and bakers yeast.

I would love some understanding on the following:

Does yeast die at high temperatures? (example: if I use vinegar in a boiled broth/soup does the yeast die?)

Is yeast active after being backed in bread?

Naturally fermented vegetables with lactic acid, and fermented via lactic acid and lactobacillus bacteria - will there be yeast in it?

Since I am allergic to yeast, woudl this mean that I would be allergic to the a bacterial yeast strain too? (saccharomyces genus)

What other factors would kill yeast? Temperature? pH? UV?

If the yeast die and the condition becomes favorable one again (ie, temperature, food source.. etc) would the yeast again proliferate?

From what I understand, yeast ceases to proliferate and exist in environments that have an ethanol content of more than 15% (alcohol above 15% like brandy, rum,.. etc). True or False? Would someone allergic to yeast react to brandy for example?

Off the wall question. Candida albicans is also a fungus. Does it eat yeast as a food source? What is their relationship and some information about how they coexist (do they help each other?)

Thank you very much for any help here. The medical professionals who gave me this information about my allergy are complete idiots and were unable to answer a single question!

Krista
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 07-02-2008, 02:29 AM
admin's Avatar
Administrator
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Posts: 1,418
Thanks: 883
Thanked 68 Times in 58 Posts
Default Re: Yeast - in food questions about

Hello Krista,
i am not sure i can answer all your questions but if you are allergic to a yeast molecule such as a protein yeast allergen, then baking it would just kill the yeast but the protein would still remain there (and you would still get allergies to it).

One question: what symptoms do you get when you eat yeast bread? Also have you been diagnosed by a doctor for yeast allergies ( by a test?) because many people have Coeliac an immune reaction against gluten (possible you may have coeliac or similar)?
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 07-06-2008, 10:41 PM
Pipette Filler
Points: 424, Level: 8 Points: 424, Level: 8 Points: 424, Level: 8
Activity: 0% Activity: 0% Activity: 0%
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Posts: 3
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Default Re: Yeast - in food questions about

I have been tested.
The test came back positive for bakers and brewers yeast allergy.
I found this a bit vague. I am not sure if it is the protein I am allergic to or if it is the

I don't eat bread, but I asked the question to try and understand more completely what happens to yeast when high temperatures.

Does this mean that if I cultured for example kefir, that even if the kefir were heated and the yeast culture killed, that the protein of the yeast would remain?

If there is yeast is there always a yeast protein? Or is it possible to have a cultured yeast with no protein?
That might sound dum, but I am not sure. For example. We take apple cider which has no yeast. We allow it to ferment for 6 months into a cider vinegar. The ACV has yeast in it, but didn't start with it. If the ACV is heated and the yeast killed, does the yeast protein remain even though there wasn't any yeast in the apple cider?... before it became a vinegar?

I appreciate your help here.
Are all probiotics and bacteria "proteins"?
Are fungus' proteins?
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 07-06-2008, 11:44 PM
Pipette Filler
Points: 424, Level: 8 Points: 424, Level: 8 Points: 424, Level: 8
Activity: 0% Activity: 0% Activity: 0%
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Posts: 3
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Default Re: Yeast - in food questions about

The lab did give me information that vinegar, beer, wine and any other "undistilled" alcohols were not good for me,.. but that distilled thigns like vodka, brandy.. etc were okay.

Based on the "yeast protein" theory.. that the yeast dies but leaves the protein. This doesn't make sense either because brandy is distilled wine....? So wouldn't the yeast protein still be there?!.. even if it wasn't alive?
Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
food , questions , yeast


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
>>>> LOWER CHOLESTEROL <<<< Janis Stroud Forum Physik 0 09-22-2009 04:39 PM
Politics And Cannibalism? Introducing The Dourties, Chelsea, Bill, Hillary, Barrack Obama, George Bush, Jr., And All Of Capital Hill! jon_johnfrancisayres@yahoo.com Microbiology Forum 0 10-06-2007 05:59 AM
New Saccharomyces Sequences 09/08/04 SGD Sequences Yeast Forum 0 09-13-2004 10:07 PM
New Saccharomyces Sequences 08/11/04 SGD Sequences Yeast Forum 0 08-12-2004 12:26 AM


All times are GMT. The time now is 12:26 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2005 - 2012 Molecular Station | All Rights Reserved
Page generated in 0.18139 seconds with 16 queries