Go Back   Science Forums Biology Forum Molecular Biology Forum Physics Chemistry Forum > Molecular Research Topics Forum > Protocols and Methods Forum
Register Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Protocols and Methods Forum Post Any Protocol, Method, Technique, Procedure or Tips / Troubleshooting for any Molecular Biology Technique.


Biology newbie in need of help regarding autoclaving

Biology newbie in need of help regarding autoclaving - Protocols and Methods Forum

Biology newbie in need of help regarding autoclaving - Post Any Protocol, Method, Technique, Procedure or Tips / Troubleshooting for any Molecular Biology Technique.


Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 02-18-2011, 03:42 PM
Pipette Filler
Points: 40, Level: 1 Points: 40, Level: 1 Points: 40, Level: 1
Activity: 0% Activity: 0% Activity: 0%
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 3
Thanks: 1
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Default Biology newbie in need of help regarding autoclaving



As the title says this is my first foray into biological lab techniques. I'm actually a chemist but my lab has started some biological chemistry work. WE'll be using peptides to synthesize inorganic materials basically. What I want to know is for this kind of work is it necessary to autoclave everything you use and when you autoclave do you have to autoclave all your equipment (including things like the bottles that contain buffer)?
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 02-21-2011, 11:48 AM
Pipette Filler
Points: 53, Level: 1 Points: 53, Level: 1 Points: 53, Level: 1
Activity: 0% Activity: 0% Activity: 0%
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 15
Thanks: 0
Thanked 8 Times in 7 Posts
Default Re: Biology newbie in need of help regarding autoclaving

That entirely depends what you are working with. For example if you are supplied the proteins and they are frozen/in powder form and you resuspend them before use then there is no need to autoclave anything. If you are growing the proteins up from bacteria then pretty much everything involved with the bacteria needs to be sterilish. Buffers for protein purification would probably have a longer shelf-life if you autoclave them, but its not worth it as the buffer components would likely start to precipitate out long before any bugs move in.

Perhaps if you could tell us more specificially what you're doing we could answer better?
Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Helen Troilo For This Useful Post:
azzurrifan (02-22-2011)
  #3  
Old 02-22-2011, 03:36 PM
Pipette Filler
Points: 40, Level: 1 Points: 40, Level: 1 Points: 40, Level: 1
Activity: 0% Activity: 0% Activity: 0%
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 3
Thanks: 1
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Default Re: Biology newbie in need of help regarding autoclaving

The peptides have been synthesized for us and are in powder form. THey need only be dissolved in buffer. Basically we will be using the peptides to reduce metal ions and form metal nanoparticles. The peptides would then serve as a stabilizing agent.
Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to azzurrifan For This Useful Post:
admin (02-22-2011)
  #4  
Old 02-22-2011, 03:56 PM
admin's Avatar
Administrator
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Posts: 1,418
Thanks: 883
Thanked 68 Times in 58 Posts
Default Re: Biology newbie in need of help regarding autoclaving

Hi Azzurrifan,
generally in molecular biology labs we autoclave most things that can be autoclaved - this includes pipette tips, equipment such as glassware, and even buffers and water in glassware.

The reason being if you spend X amount of time and money, you do not want to lose them both because you didn't want to spend a bit of time autoclaving. Autoclaving only costs time, not money usually. Even better, get a bunch of tips, glassware and buffers all at once - autoclave them - and they can last you your whole project probably.

Some people cut corners, but you have to assess where you can cut them. I would mainly keep on the safe side and work with the peptide sterile (using autoclaved stuff), because the last thing you want to find is that you have contamination in your stocks - or your amazing findings are actually due to contamination - or worse that they your findings may be lost or be complicated by things growing in them.

I think it is important to also find out if autoclaving will affect your experiments negatively, does it generate nanoparticles that may compromise your study? I am not sure about this but would pay to look it up - what do others in your field do?

Last edited by admin; 02-22-2011 at 03:59 PM.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
autoclaving , biology , newbie


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Plant Synthetic Biology Post Doctoral Positions Medford,June Arabidopsis and Plant Biology 0 02-04-2009 11:18 PM
4 Post doc positions within Plant Biology at the University ofCopenhagen Søren Bak Arabidopsis and Plant Biology 0 03-25-2007 08:52 PM
We are sending to each of you now the REPORT from the 2004 World Conference on Mathematical Biology and Ecology together with instructions of how to get FREE registration in the conference of MATHEMATICS and COMPUTERS in BIOLOGY in Venice (Venetia), W SEAS Biosciences News Protein Forum 0 08-28-2004 03:55 PM
Absolutely Free Participation in our conference..., 5th International Conference on "Mathematics and Computers in Biology and Chemistry" WSEAS Biology Protein Forum 0 07-03-2004 02:05 PM


All times are GMT. The time now is 05:10 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2005 - 2012 Molecular Station | All Rights Reserved
Page generated in 0.13516 seconds with 16 queries