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RNase Zap (Invitrogen) and RNase Away (Molecular Bioproducts)

RNase Zap (Invitrogen) and RNase Away (Molecular Bioproducts) - Protocols and Methods Forum

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  #1  
Old 02-16-2009, 02:56 PM
Igor Sagdeev
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Default RNase Zap (Invitrogen) and RNase Away (Molecular Bioproducts)



Can anyone comment of the difference(s) between these products:

RNase Zap (Invitrogen)

and

RNase Away (Molecular Bioproducts)?

Thank you in advance!

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  #2  
Old 02-17-2009, 12:16 AM
DK
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Default RNase Zap (Invitrogen) and RNase Away (Molecular Bioproducts)

In article <[Only registered users see links. ].net> , Igor Sagdeev <[Only registered users see links. ]> wrote:

Well,

MSDS for both products makes it reasonably obvious that RNAse Away
is simply a sodium hydroxide at unspecified concentration and RNase
Zap is simply an SDS at unknown concentration.

Take your pick. I'd contend that with already clean glassware that was
not handled by bare hands neither is necessary. The "RNAses are so
everywhere that the only way to get rid of them is to treat everything
with some magic expensive solutions" is basically a myth.

DK
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  #3  
Old 02-17-2009, 01:04 PM
talulah gosh
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Default RNase Zap (Invitrogen) and RNase Away (Molecular Bioproducts)

Can you also tell this to our PI?

On Feb 17, 4:07*am, Christian Praetorius <p...@gmx.net> wrote:

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  #4  
Old 02-17-2009, 06:17 PM
Michael Sullivan
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Default RNase Zap (Invitrogen) and RNase Away (Molecular Bioproducts)


On Feb 16, 2009, at 6:16 PM, DK wrote:


The more one works with RNA, the one more realizes that DK's point is
true!

My favorite example of the extreme paranoia of RNases was a lab I
knew of that baked the mortars and pestles they used to grind tissue
for RNA preps! So there might be a little RNase on those: far more
will be liberated when the tissue gets ground! They did go through a
lot of mortars since these tended to break when cooling too fast out
of the oven.

As for magic solutions, I personally use dilute bleach when I feel
some treatment is called for. Ambion's web site even says this is an
alternative to their solution.

Another hint is that usually there is no special need to treat water
with DEPC. My experience is that 18 megaohm water from a milliQ
system is essentially RNase free.

Mike
---
Michael L. Sullivan
Plant Research Molecular Geneticist
US Dairy Forage Research Center
ARS-USDA
1925 Linden Drive West
Madison, WI 53706
(608) 890-0046 (Phone)
(608) 890-0076 (FAX)

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  #5  
Old 02-17-2009, 11:58 PM
Dr. Hiranya S. Roychowdhury
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Default RNase Zap (Invitrogen) and RNase Away (Molecular Bioproducts)

You guys have summarized the paranoia well. However, in my experience,
baking the glasswares always worked rather well. Of course, whoever pours
LiqN2 on the Mortar/pestle straight out of the oven has a problem far more
serious than RNase in the prep.

Hiranya.




--
Hiranya S. Roychowdhury, Ph.D.
Asst. Professor,
Health & Public Services
Dona Ana Community College
New Mexico State University
Las Cruces, NM 88003

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  #6  
Old 02-18-2009, 02:24 AM
Aawara Chowdhury
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Default RNase Zap (Invitrogen) and RNase Away (Molecular Bioproducts)

In <Wlnml.10820$[Only registered users see links. ]>,
DK <[Only registered users see links. ]> wrote:


Let me elaborate on this statement, because I take issue with it in part.

My Ph.D. thesis was on the structure of retroviral RNAs. The structural
analysis, obtained in part by digestion with structure/sequence specific
RNases of end-labeled viral RNAs, was exquisitely sensitive to nuclease
contamination. I've recovered RNase A activity in bottles that were
autoclaved .....

Having said that, for 99% of uses, the background level of RNase makes
no difference at all. Further, while I can appreciate that there may
be a loss of signal if one does a Northern for full-length mRNA, these
days, most quantitation is performed using techniques such as real-time
PCR of reverse-transcribed samples. Such techniques are much less
sensitive to small amounts of degradation by RNases in the environment.

AC
--
Email: echo 36434455860060025978157675027927670979097959886449 930P | dc
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  #7  
Old 02-18-2009, 05:51 AM
DK
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Default RNase Zap (Invitrogen) and RNase Away (Molecular Bioproducts)

In article <[Only registered users see links. ].net> , Michael Sullivan <[Only registered users see links. ]> wrote:

Of course. The water goes through several cartridges that
all absorb proteins and peptides (ion exchange resins,
activated charcoal and even the final 0.2 micron filter that is
not designed to be low protein binding) plus the whole system
is "sanitized" with NaOH on a periodic basis, killing any
microbes that might be a source of RNAses.

DK




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  #8  
Old 02-18-2009, 06:10 PM
Nick Theodorakis
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Default RNase Zap (Invitrogen) and RNase Away (Molecular Bioproducts)

On Feb 18, 11:55*am, "Jayakumar, R" <[Only registered users see links. ]>
wrote:

My comment is the same as the others who note that ultra-pure water is
free of RNase contamination and that RNAse-phobia is way overdone. I
haven't used any DEPC or similar reagents since grad school, and
haven't had a problem even when probing for full length mRNAs in
Northerns. I never understood why anyone would pay good money to get
their water ultrapure and then deliberately contiminate with something
else. If your water is not pure enough to use for RNA, then it's
probably not good for most other applications.

I don't store water for RNA use, in any case; I get it fresh from the
tap.

Nick

--
Nick Theodorakis
[Only registered users see links. ]
contact form:
[Only registered users see links. ]
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  #9  
Old 02-18-2009, 09:03 PM
Michael Sullivan
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Default RNase Zap (Invitrogen) and RNase Away (Molecular Bioproducts)

It seems to me there is far more "transitory" time in the course of
an experiment over which you have little control than the brief time
you will have a container open to dispense water from the milliQ into
it. How long will a bottle or tube of DEPC treated water be open
while you are later dispensing it into reaction tubes, how long are
reaction tubes open while you are adding other reagents, etc? And how
about all those other reagents that go into an experiment, many of
which you cannot treat with DEPC? And DEPC treating the water because
the container might not be clean enough seems extreme since glassware
could be treated with dilute base or bleach or baked to render it
RNase free, or one could use sterile disposable plasticware which is
again, in my experience, RNase free whether marketed that way or not.

Also, where do you draw the line at being "prudent"? Besides gloves,
should you wear a surgical cap, gown and mask? Should you work in a
hood or a glove box?

In my experience, in a reasonably clean lab, there just isn't RNase
all over the place ready to fall into your experiment and using
MilliQ water directly without DEPC treatment has simply not been a
problem for me or (judging from previous discussions here) many other
researchers. So while I agree we shouldn't be penny wise and pound
foolish, I don't have a problem saving my pennies by not spending
them to solve a non-existent problem.

Mike

On Feb 18, 2009, at 10:55 AM, Jayakumar, R wrote:


---
Michael L. Sullivan
Plant Research Molecular Geneticist
US Dairy Forage Research Center
ARS-USDA
1925 Linden Drive West
Madison, WI 53706
(608) 890-0046 (Phone)
(608) 890-0076 (FAX)

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  #10  
Old 02-19-2009, 01:37 AM
DK
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Default RNase Zap (Invitrogen) and RNase Away (Molecular Bioproducts)

In article <7jKml.1580$[Only registered users see links. ]>, [Only registered users see links. ] wrote:

Aawara, I don't doubt your observation for a nanosecond but let
me ask this: Any chance that the RNAse activity was there
*because* of the autoclaving?

In my experience, with autoclaves being dirty, dirty things, anything
autoclaved is simply not clean. Sterile - yes, but not clean. Few
observations: 1) Most certainly, our autoclaved water results in
~ 10X lower electroporation efficiencies in comparison to water
taken directly "from the tap"; 2) autoclaved tips do not behave the same,
always exhibiting higher retention; 3) racks used to autoclave tips
tend to accumulate ugly brownish residue inside them over time.

Because of these things, I like baked glassware much better and in our
lab it is a rule that protein crystallization has to be done with tips
out of the bag, never to be autoclaved.

DK

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