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transgene insertion and repetitive sequences

transgene insertion and repetitive sequences - Protocols and Methods Forum

transgene insertion and repetitive sequences - Post Any Protocol, Method, Technique, Procedure or Tips / Troubleshooting for any Molecular Biology Technique.


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Old 08-15-2007, 12:41 PM
Tom Anderson
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Default transgene insertion and repetitive sequences



On Tue, 14 Aug 2007, Ed Siefker wrote:


How about going about it a different way. Go back to FISH and try and get
a resolution higher than 'chromosome 3'. Conventional FISH should get you
to band resolution, and if you can get fibre FISH to work, and you have
suitable probes, you can take it to crazy resolution, potentially tens of
kilobases.

Once you've got that far, order up a genomic clone (or several) from
normal mice covering the area of the insert and use it as a probe on a
Southern blot. Comparing the pattern to that from normal mice will tell
you with, i think, a high degree of precision where your insert is.

If you want to go even higher than that, hmm. You need a clone or PCR
amplicon to sequence, and you're back to where you are already.


How about doing this protocol, but using an enzyme which cuts inside the X
chromosome repeats? You wouldn't get your transgene in the clones, but you
could get the X-3 junction, and the clone would be smaller. You'd need to
use a primer matching the repeats for the screening step. You run the risk
of just cloning repeats, but if you gel-purify the digest to remove all
the fragments smaller than the size of a repeat, you avoid that.
Alternatively, double-digest with an enzyme which cuts the repeats and one
which doesn't (which give different sticky ends), and clone into a vector
cut so it will only take inserts with one end from each enzyme.

Another way of getting rid of real X DNA would be to find some genomics
people and get them to flow-sort chromosomes from your mice. Once people
have things set up for doing this, it works very well.

Aha! Do FISH-and-Southern mapping, then make Boulter clones with an enzyme
that cuts the X repeats, then do the screening step with a primer that
matches the closest known bit of chromosome 3 sequence. This does require
that you map the location to within a few kb, though.

Disclaimer: i haven't had lunch yet, so some or all of these ideas may be
total bunk.


Make a new mouse?

tom

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Tom Anderson, MRC Laboratory for Molecular Cell Biology, UCL, London WC1E 6BT
(t) +44 (20) 76797264 (f) +44 (20) 76797805 (e) [Only registered users see links. ]

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Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
transgene insertion and repetitive sequences Tom Anderson Protocols and Methods Forum 0 08-17-2007 02:30 PM
transgene insertion and repetitive sequences Ed Siefker Protocols and Methods Forum 0 08-16-2007 05:58 PM
transgene insertion and repetitive sequences Ed Siefker Protocols and Methods Forum 0 08-14-2007 07:04 PM


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