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-   -   How important is -80C? (http://www.molecularstation.com/forum/protocols-methods-forum/19208-how-important-80c.html)

Chris Jones 04-26-2007 01:37 PM

How important is -80C?
 
We're looking into replacing one of two -80 degree freezers, and the
question came up as to whether we should bother. Currently most of the
contents are bacterial and plasmid stocks as well as some isotopes. It
seems to me that these would fare no worse in a -20 degree box, but I
wondered what experience others have had. What samples "must" be stored
at -80C?

Thanks,

Chris Jones

Tom Knight 04-27-2007 05:40 PM

How important is -80C?
 
Chris Jones <[Only registered and activated users can see links. Click Here To Register...]> writes:


Bacterial stocks are not stable at -20. Competent cells, in
particular, lose competence quickly at -20, but even glycerol stocks
will suffer over year long periods at -20. Some restriction enzymes
are not stable at -20 and need to be stored at -80. I have no idea
why you are storing isotopes at -80, unless they are sensitive
chemicals. The atoms certainly don't decay any differently depending
on the temperature. It might be possible that radiation damage of the
chemicals is affected.

You want to be sure that your -20 freezers are not frost-free
freezers, which will subject samples to heat/thaw cycles and destroy
living samples very quickly.




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