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Wave/Particle nature of light question.

Wave/Particle nature of light question. - Physics Forum

Wave/Particle nature of light question. - Physics Forum. Discuss and ask physics questions, kinematics and other physics problems.


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  #11  
Old 09-26-2008, 05:25 AM
N:dlzc D:aol T:com \(dlzc\)
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Default Wave/Particle nature of light question.

Dear Gary Helfert:

"Gary Helfert" <[Only registered users see links. ]> wrote in message
news:[Only registered users see links. ]...
....
[Only registered users see links. ]

At least one order of magnitude less than heated gas.


Smaller.


Not likely. Mouse farts don't move the Earth much.

David A. Smith


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  #12  
Old 09-26-2008, 05:33 AM
Androcles
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Default Wave/Particle nature of light question.


"Gary Helfert" <[Only registered users see links. ]> wrote in message
news:[Only registered users see links. ]...

No. Sunlight is driving it to a higher orbit, about an inch every trillion
years.
It is heating the atmosphere on the day side which is boiling away into
space
like a Crooke's radiometer without the vacuum.
Hopefully we'll get hit by a comet on the night side and that will top up
the
material lost and push the Earth back into its proper orbit. It may wipe out
all life, but that's not important, there is no intelligent life here
anyway.



How much pressure do you get here:
[Only registered users see links. ]
and here:
http://thumbs.dreamstime.com/thumb_1...2382eH65l2.jpg
and here:
http://www.masterplumber.net/no_heat...oseupgauge.jpg
??
Pressure isn't really the right term to use in a physics newsgroup, is it?



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  #13  
Old 09-26-2008, 02:19 PM
dlzc
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Default Wave/Particle nature of light question.

Hello Androcles:

On Sep 25, 11:00*am, "Androcles" <Headmas...@Hogwarts.physics> wrote:
....

Your word "essentialy" is key. The cork is *always* a surfer, but
lack of return waves tend to displace a cork towards that which is
dissipating momentum. And/or away from that which is "radiating"
momentum (ship's prow for example).
[Only registered users see links. ]


Damned good question. It should... does the "angular momentum" of an
atom orbital change translate directly to the expected linear momentum
of a single photon. Like someone releasing an olympic hammer they are
swinging around and around... the hammer et al travels largely in a
straight line (but it is still trying to rotate "slowly" about its
center of mass at the final rate it was being swung 'round).

David A. Smith
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  #14  
Old 09-26-2008, 04:16 PM
Androcles
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Default Wave/Particle nature of light question.


"dlzc" <[Only registered users see links. ]> wrote in message
news:[Only registered users see links. ]...
Hello Androcles:

On Sep 25, 11:00 am, "Androcles" <Headmas...@Hogwarts.physics> wrote:
....

Your word "essentialy" is key.
==================================
I didn't use it. "Essentially" has two ells.
==================================

The cork is *always* a surfer, but
lack of return waves tend to displace a cork towards that which is
dissipating momentum.

===================================
http://www.androcles01.pwp.blueyonde...andingWave.gif
What momentum?


http://www.androcles01.pwp.blueyonde...ave/ripple.gif
Is the centre a singularity?

====================================

And/or away from that which is "radiating"
momentum (ship's prow for example).
[Only registered users see links. ]
=======================================
Drift as a result of current or tide was considered in an earlier post.
Your exceptions aren't doing you much good here.

=======================================


Damned good question.
=========================================
All my questions are damned good. They are designed to
make sheep (that only believe what they are told) to think.
This is, after all, a science newsgroup.
=========================================



It should... does the "angular momentum" of an
atom orbital change translate directly to the expected linear momentum
of a single photon. Like someone releasing an olympic hammer they are
swinging around and around... the hammer et al travels largely in a
straight line (but it is still trying to rotate "slowly" about its
center of mass at the final rate it was being swung 'round).

David A. Smith
===========================================
"They suggest rather that, as has already been shown to the first order of
small quantities, the same laws of electrodynamics and optics will be valid
for all frames of reference for which the equations of mechanics hold good."
-- Albert ****wit Einstein.
How come the clown contradicts himself?













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  #15  
Old 09-26-2008, 07:58 PM
dlzc
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Default Wave/Particle nature of light question.

Hello Androcles:

On Sep 25, 10:33*pm, "Androcles" <Headmas...@Hogwarts.physics> wrote:
....

I would offer that the solar wind tends to circularize our orbit at
some nominal value, and when it ceases (or lessens as it is is now) I
would expect the ellipticity to increase by some amount.
Additionally, we are net accumulating mass from the solar wind (unless
you have a citation to the contrary), and accumulating a tad more on
the pole facing into our orbital motion, which would tend to *lower*
our orbit.

David A. Smith
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  #16  
Old 09-26-2008, 08:45 PM
Androcles
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Default Wave/Particle nature of light question.


"dlzc" <[Only registered users see links. ]> wrote in message
news:[Only registered users see links. ]...
Hello Androcles:

On Sep 25, 10:33 pm, "Androcles" <Headmas...@Hogwarts.physics> wrote:
....

I would offer
========================

No thanks, you snipping bastard.




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  #17  
Old 03-31-2012, 11:17 AM
Pipette Filler
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Default Re: Wave/Particle nature of light question.

i think that the answer of your first question is in the Cooke's radiometer.and the second one is the it will be a no whether.and you please also read the newtons third law for the answer.thanks.
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