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Momentum and weight relationship

Momentum and weight relationship - Physics Forum

Momentum and weight relationship - Physics Forum. Discuss and ask physics questions, kinematics and other physics problems.


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  #1  
Old 07-27-2008, 10:17 AM
SolomonW
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Default Momentum and weight relationship



In article <d9338e9d-2dbe-40d0-81b1-49be4726efc9
@a21g2000prf.googlegroups.com>, [Only registered users see links. ] says...

Light has momentum but no mass.


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  #2  
Old 07-27-2008, 11:18 AM
Pmb
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Default Momentum and weight relationship


"SolomonW" <[Only registered users see links. ]> wrote in message
news:MPG.22f6f651db34de8b9896c2@News...

You're thinking about proper mass, not inertial mass. Inertial mass is
*defined* as m = p/v.

Pete


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  #3  
Old 07-28-2008, 10:16 AM
SolomonW
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Default Momentum and weight relationship

In article <[Only registered users see links. ]>,
[Only registered users see links. ] says...

Well light is pure energy, it has no inertial mass. That is why it will
always travel at the speed of light in space.

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  #4  
Old 07-28-2008, 10:21 AM
Androcles
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Default Momentum and weight relationship


"SolomonW" <[Only registered users see links. ]> wrote in message
news:MPG.22f8477023920d169896ca@News...
| In article <[Only registered users see links. ]>,
| [Only registered users see links. ] says...
| >
| > "SolomonW" <[Only registered users see links. ]> wrote in message
| > news:MPG.22f6f651db34de8b9896c2@News...
| > > In article <d9338e9d-2dbe-40d0-81b1-49be4726efc9
| > > @a21g2000prf.googlegroups.com>, [Only registered users see links. ]
says...
| > >> Momentum is defined as: mass times velocity.
| > >
| > > Light has momentum but no mass.
| >
| > You're thinking about proper mass, not inertial mass. Inertial mass is
| > *defined* as m = p/v.
| >
| > Pete
| >
| >
| >
|
| Well light is pure energy, it has no inertial mass. That is why it will
| always travel at the speed of light in space.
|
So light travels at the speed of light... amazing.
Does a turtle travels at the speed of turtles?



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  #5  
Old 07-28-2008, 10:22 AM
Pmb
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Default Momentum and weight relationship


"SolomonW" <[Only registered users see links. ]> wrote in message
news:MPG.22f8477023920d169896ca@News...

That is incorrect. Light has zero *proper mass* and not zero inertial mass.
Inertial mass is *defined* as m = p/v. You can choose to redefine things to
fit your opinions but that will not change the definition of inertial mass
as it is found in the relativity literature.

And there is no such thing as "pure energy".

Pete


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  #6  
Old 07-29-2008, 12:58 PM
SolomonW
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Default Momentum and weight relationship

In article <g5hjk.75491$8_2.3999@newsfe08.ams2>,
[Only registered users see links. ]ics says...

The key difference here is that the speed of light is the max speed
possible.
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  #7  
Old 07-29-2008, 10:48 PM
Androcles
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Default Momentum and weight relationship


"SolomonW" <[Only registered users see links. ]> wrote in message
news:MPG.22f9bf14c48008d09896ce@News...
| In article <g5hjk.75491$8_2.3999@newsfe08.ams2>,
| [Only registered users see links. ]ics says...
| >
| > "SolomonW" <[Only registered users see links. ]> wrote in message
| > news:MPG.22f8477023920d169896ca@News...
| > | In article <[Only registered users see links. ]>,
| > | [Only registered users see links. ] says...
| > | >
| > | > "SolomonW" <[Only registered users see links. ]> wrote in message
| > | > news:MPG.22f6f651db34de8b9896c2@News...
| > | > > In article <d9338e9d-2dbe-40d0-81b1-49be4726efc9
| > | > > @a21g2000prf.googlegroups.com>, [Only registered users see links. ]
| > says...
| > | > >> Momentum is defined as: mass times velocity.
| > | > >
| > | > > Light has momentum but no mass.
| > | >
| > | > You're thinking about proper mass, not inertial mass. Inertial mass
is
| > | > *defined* as m = p/v.
| > | >
| > | > Pete
| > | >
| > | >
| > | >
| > |
| > | Well light is pure energy, it has no inertial mass. That is why it
will
| > | always travel at the speed of light in space.
| > |
| > So light travels at the speed of light... amazing.
| > Does a turtle travels at the speed of turtles?
|
| The key difference here is that the speed of light is the max speed
| possible.

That's funny, muons originate in the upper atmosphere, live for
2.2 microseconds and make it to sea level. Where did you hear
your stupid fairy tale?


The key difference here is that you are a ****headed dingleberry,
willing to listen to any crap and repeat it without a ****ing clue
what you are babbling about.


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