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Special Theory of Relativity question

Special Theory of Relativity question - Physics Forum

Special Theory of Relativity question - Physics Forum. Discuss and ask physics questions, kinematics and other physics problems.


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  #1  
Old 07-18-2008, 04:24 AM
mroseberry99@hotmail.com
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Default Special Theory of Relativity question



For two objects sitting side by side at "rest" time passes at the same
rate. As one object starts moving, time starts to slow down for it
relative to the one at rest, however infinitesimal at low speeds.
When the speeds start to approach the speed of light, time slows down
considerably until ulitimately it stops when the object reaches the
speed of light. My question is this. If I am the object at rest
standing on the earth and my friend is the object in motion and
travels from the sun to the earth at near the speed of light say .
9999c and I time him, it takes a little over 8 minutes in my time.
From his perspective since time is almost stopped it takes a very
short period of his time to get from the sun to the earth(Let's just
say it takes 1 minute(it would be a lot less than that at .9999c).
That would mean that he traveled 93 million miles in 1 minute which
would be way faster than the speed of light from his perspective, but
I know that is impossible. The only thing I can think of is that when
traveling close to the speed of light the distance in the direction of
motion starts to shrink. Can someone please explain this to me?
Thanks.
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  #2  
Old 07-18-2008, 09:00 AM
Androcles
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Default Special Theory of Relativity question


<[Only registered users see links. ]> wrote in message
news:[Only registered users see links. ]...
| For two objects sitting side by side at "rest" time passes at the same
| rate.

Oh really? Does the distance stay the same as well?


| As one object starts moving, time starts to slow down for it
| relative to the one at rest, however infinitesimal at low speeds.


You are pulling my leg, right?



| When the speeds start to approach the speed of light, time slows down
| considerably until ulitimately it stops when the object reaches the
| speed of light.

Oh yeah? Who say so?



| My question is this.

Ah, you have a question... but first you want me to believe
that crap about time slowing down.



| If I am the object at rest
| standing on the earth and my friend is the object in motion and
| travels from the sun to the earth at near the speed of light say .
| 9999c and I time him, it takes a little over 8 minutes in my time.
| From his perspective since time is almost stopped it takes a very
| short period of his time to get from the sun to the earth(Let's just
| say it takes 1 minute(it would be a lot less than that at .9999c).
| That would mean that he traveled 93 million miles in 1 minute which
| would be way faster than the speed of light from his perspective, but
| I know that is impossible. The only thing I can think of is that when
| traveling close to the speed of light the distance in the direction of
| motion starts to shrink. Can someone please explain this to me?
| Thanks.

Sure I can explain it to you. Whether you understand the explanation
or not is up to you. Einstein was a great genius or an idiot.
The great genius said

'we establish by definition that the "time" required by
light to travel from A to B equals the "time" it requires
to travel from B to A' because I SAY SO and you have to
agree because I'm the great genius, STOOOPID, don't you
dare question it. -- Rabbi Albert "I'm not an idiot" Einstein


Why did Einstein say
the speed of light from A to B is c-v,
the speed of light from B to A is c+v,
the "time" each way is the same?

1/2[tau(A)+tau(A')]= tau(B)
where
A = (0,0,0,t)
A' =(0,0,0,t+x'/(c-v) +x'/(c+v))
B = (x',0,0,t+x'/(c-v))
x' = x-vt

Ref: http://www.fourmilab.ch/etexts/einst...ures/img22.gif

"Easy: he did NOT say that." - cretin [Only registered users see links. ]
According to moron van lintel, Einstein did not write the equation he wrote.

http://www.androcles01.pwp.blueyonde...rt/tAB=tBA.gif


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  #3  
Old 07-18-2008, 12:47 PM
Androcles
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Default Special Theory of Relativity question


"John Christiansen" <[Only registered users see links. ]> wrote in message
news:48807d13$0$4449$[Only registered users see links. ].telia.net. ..
| Your friend will see a length contraction in his frame of reference as you
| are suggesting yourself.

No he won't, that's ridiculous. Nobody has ever seen a "length
contraction" and never will, you ranting idiot.


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  #4  
Old 07-18-2008, 03:31 PM
dlzc
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Default Special Theory of Relativity question

Dear mroseberr...:

On Jul 17, 9:24*pm, [Only registered users see links. ] wrote:

Note that within the moving frame, everything appears to proceed
normally. Note also that time never stops, because matter *can never
reach c*. Note finally that for all frames, each instant is followed
by a successive instant... only the "distance" between events varies
with relative speed.


Yes.


6.8 seconds.


No, he measures the distance as ~1.3 million miles. Any method he
might choose to do this... parallax, whatever, returns ~1.3 million
miles travelled.


No, this is a common error, called a "frame jump". You take a
measurement in one frame and combine it with a measurement in a
different frame.

"time dilation" and "length contraction" go hand-in-hand.


And now you know why.


[Only registered users see links. ]
... down to the section on Special Relativity.

It would be best for you to ask relativity questions in the newsgroup
for that purpose: sci.physics.relativity.

David A. Smith
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  #5  
Old 07-20-2008, 03:47 AM
mroseberry99@hotmail.com
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Default Special Theory of Relativity question

On Jul 18, 8:31*am, dlzc <[Only registered users see links. ]> wrote:

Thank you John Christiansen and David Smith. Oh and thank you too
Androcles, I like to keep and open mind and view things from as many
perspectives as possible.
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  #6  
Old 07-20-2008, 01:33 PM
Androcles
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Default Special Theory of Relativity question


<[Only registered users see links. ]> wrote in message
news:[Only registered users see links. ]...
On Jul 18, 8:31 am, dlzc <[Only registered users see links. ]> wrote:

Thank you John Christiansen and David Smith. Oh and thank you too
Androcles, I like to keep and open mind and view things from as many
perspectives as possible.

================================================
Don't keep it open at both ends. I used to have an open mind until
I made it up, sheep and parrots like Smiffy don't have a mind at all.


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