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Where the universe is.

Where the universe is. - Physics Forum

Where the universe is. - Physics Forum. Discuss and ask physics questions, kinematics and other physics problems.


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  #1  
Old 04-16-2008, 09:10 PM
T-minus108
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Default Where the universe is.



So what are you saying? That what we veiw as space/time is our known
universe, and that it is only the surface of this "hypersphere"?
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  #2  
Old 04-17-2008, 09:02 PM
T-minus108
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Default Where the universe is.

> There is a physical concept bigger than the universe. You can say it


I think you are confused. We live in the dimensional space called a
brane. This brane is what we used to consider the entire universe...
but alas, the universe is always bigger than expected. So we live in
one of many branes in the universe... not one of many universe' in a
hypersphere.
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  #3  
Old 04-18-2008, 12:04 AM
T-minus108
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Default Where the universe is.



Space/time itself is our 4th dimension
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  #4  
Old 04-19-2008, 12:38 AM
T-minus108
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Default Where the universe is.

Ok, how about you write a list of all of our dimensions!

Please, post it so I can read it!
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  #5  
Old 04-19-2008, 08:11 AM
Paul Mays
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Default Where the universe is.



"T-minus108" <[Only registered users see links. ]> wrote in message
news:[Only registered users see links. ]...

Length, Width, Depth, Time....... Thats It...

--
Paul R. Mays
"I Believe in Nothing, I Know, I think I Know or I Do Not Know
I Never Believe... For to Believe is a Religious Incantation"


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  #6  
Old 04-19-2008, 04:08 PM
The Ghost In The Machine
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Default Where the universe is.

In sci.physics.relativity, T-minus108
<[Only registered users see links. ]>
wrote
on Fri, 18 Apr 2008 17:38:27 -0700 (PDT)
<[Only registered users see links. ]>:

Best I can do is mention that we have three obvious
dimensions (length, width, height), one slightly less
obvious dimension (duration), and, some have hypothetized,
a number of other dimensions (about 11, but I'd frankly
have to look and one might reasonably ask exactly what a
"dimension" is in this context) which are horribly snarled
with respect to each other, not unlike a tangle of kite
string.

In algebra, the position of a point is commonly referred
to using a triplet (x,y,z); if one needs time for an event
one can include it, resulting in a quadruplet (x,y,z,t).
Variants include x_0, x', and Chi (a letter in the
Greek Alphabet, U+03A7 in Unicode).

A quick Google coughed up

[Only registered users see links. ]

which among other things attempts to introduce a fifth
dimension to the general relativity metric.

--
#191, [Only registered users see links. ]
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Posted via a free Usenet account from [Only registered users see links. ]

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  #7  
Old 04-19-2008, 07:38 PM
Androcles
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Default Where the universe is.

"The Ghost In The Machine" <[Only registered users see links. ]> wrote in message
news:[Only registered users see links. ]...
| In sci.physics.relativity, T-minus108
| <[Only registered users see links. ]>
| wrote
| on Fri, 18 Apr 2008 17:38:27 -0700 (PDT)
| <[Only registered users see links. ]>:
| > Ok, how about you write a list of all of our dimensions!
| >
| > Please, post it so I can read it!
|
| Best I can do is mention that we have three obvious
| dimensions (length, width, height), one slightly less
| obvious dimension (duration), and, some have hypothetized,
| a number of other dimensions (about 11, but I'd frankly
| have to look and one might reasonably ask exactly what a
| "dimension" is in this context) which are horribly snarled
| with respect to each other, not unlike a tangle of kite
| string.
|
| In algebra, the position of a point is commonly referred
| to using a triplet (x,y,z); if one needs time for an event
| one can include it, resulting in a quadruplet (x,y,z,t).


Which is fine as long as one doesn't call the the quadruplet a vector
or treat it as a vector.

The triplet (x,y,z) is a vector, it has the property that (x,y,z) +
(-x,-y,-z) = (0,0,0).
(x,y,z,t) does not have this property, there is no -t.
Or to put it simply, one cannot travel back in time.
Mere symbol shuffling would imply that was possible, but when
the symbols represent physical quantities one must obey not only
the rules of algebra but the rules of Nature as well, or one simply
doesn't understand Nature.
Another dimension you can add is mass, but again there is no negative mass.
The quintuplet (x,y,z,t,m) might represent a "centre of gravity" with the
strength of a gravity field located at x,y,z and instant t.
The shopping list can be as large as you like, one could for example add
colour as anothe dimension and make it a sextuplet and so on,
(x,y,z,t,m, (r,g,b)).



| Variants include x_0, x', and Chi (a letter in the
| Greek Alphabet, U+03A7 in Unicode).
|
| A quick Google coughed up
|
| [Only registered users see links. ]
|
| which among other things attempts to introduce a fifth
| dimension to the general relativity metric.


With your one track mind you always have to put in a plug for your
precious ****in' crank religion, don't you?
What's the metric from red apple to purple plum in general relativity?
Mrs. White, in the Library, with the Rope." perhaps.
[Only registered users see links. ]

The list of all dimensions is... err... rather long.
--
This message is brought to you by Androcles
[Only registered users see links. ]



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  #8  
Old 04-20-2008, 02:12 AM
Ralph Hertle
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Default Where the universe is. Either it is or it is not.

[Only registered users see links. ] wrote:



Mark:

Three words: "Parallel rail wheeled car transport."


Ralph Hertle
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  #9  
Old 04-20-2008, 05:41 AM
The Ghost In The Machine
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Default Where the universe is.

In sci.physics.relativity, Androcles
<Headmaster@Hogwarts.physics>
wrote
on Sat, 19 Apr 2008 20:38:22 +0100
<TSrOj.20530$_h7.2821@newsfe05.ams2>:

Not a vector; it is a triplet. Unless you want to restrict vectors to
those spaces with the standard Euclidean metric:

D(p1, p2) = sqrt(sum(i=1,n) (p2_i^2 - p1_i^2))


This is true.


Flying green elephants minus the yellow snow, of course.


--
#191, [Only registered users see links. ]
Q: "Why is my computer doing that?"
A: "Don't do that and you'll be fine."

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  #10  
Old 04-20-2008, 09:09 AM
nuny@bid.nes
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Default Where the universe is. Either it is or it is not.

On Apr 19, 7:12 pm, Ralph Hertle <[Only registered users see links. ]> wrote:


*sigh*

Ralph, for someone who claims to be an expert at 2D and 3D CAD you
are spectacularly ignorant of some fundamentals of geometry.

Consider laying a track on a sphere. The midline of the track
follows the 45 degree N latitude all the way around. Are that track's
rails parallel?


Mark L. Fergerson
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