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Introduction to the theory of gravitation

Introduction to the theory of gravitation - Physics Forum

Introduction to the theory of gravitation - Physics Forum. Discuss and ask physics questions, kinematics and other physics problems.


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  #1  
Old 11-14-2007, 01:04 AM
Michal Witkowski
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Default Introduction to the theory of gravitation



Introduction to the theory of gravitation





1) Assumptions

2) Description

3) Experiment

4) Archive



Ad.1
a) gravitation is a dipole

b) inside a mass the dipoles can freely rotate in three dimensions



Ad.2
I do not want to explain why I made such an assumption. I would just like to
suggest a simple thought experiment:

A magnet bar (at the beginning of the description it will be a good
alternate of the gravitational interaction) should be placed for example on
a cork on water. It should be placed in a flat position just like a compass
needle. It will freely float on water and will of course take the position
north-south. However this interaction is weak and should not be considered
for the sake of this experiment. Then we put another identical magnet on
water next to the first one placing it in any optional direction. These two
magnets will always place themselves in the direction of mutual attraction.
Regardless of how we will place them at the beginning they will always take
such a position. Further on let's add another, third magnet. This one will
also rotate towards the other two so that it will attract them and so on.
With each added magnet the interaction will become weaker and weaker and
with a large number of magnets it will finally settle at certain level. This
experiment can be repeated with magnetized marbles. They will huddle
together in a little chaotic mass but each next one will be attracted. This
mass of magnetic dipoles resembles the gravitation dipoles only to a small
extent as magnets that have already joined cannot rotate freely towards one
another, and the gravitation dipoles can. Because the gravitation dipoles
rotate freely in three dimensions we do not encounter negative gravitational
interaction, it is not visible. The dipoles will always turn in the
direction of attraction. This assumption results in a few matters, one of
them is that the gravitational interaction is most probably much stronger
then we can feel. What we feel is the result of balancing between attraction
and repulsion which finally settles at the level of weak attraction.
Following this thought we can wonder if such an attraction really decreases
with the inverted square of the distance. It is the resultant of attraction
and repulsion so it may come out that the attraction weakens slower than the
repulsion which, in consequence in large distances (ex. astronomical
distances) will result in repulsion stronger than attraction.

Coming back to the atomic scale. In the atom (proton, neutron, electron)
there is one element which can change its direction in a free manner, it is
the spin. The axis of rotation of the spin most probably determines the
gravitational poles "plus" and "minus".



Ad.3
Theoretically, testing it by means of an experiment should be possible
however would require an appropriate equipment to be constructed. First the
spins in some kind of material (solid body) should be put in order, at least
part of them because, as I suppose, a huge amount of energy is required to
put in order more of them. I tried to place a brass disc in a strong,
homogeneous magnetic field that is between two disc made of neodymium
magnets. The magnets are motionless whereas the brass discs can be rotated
freely to the left or to the right. The spins should place themselves in the
"up-down" and "down-up" direction - at least some of them. At this moment
nothing is happening yet. Until we start rotating the disc. I assume that
the spin rotation speed is very high (if we treat the spin as a particle). I
assume an ideal situation in which 50% of the spins is in the up-down
position and 50% in the down-up position. When the disc starts to rotate ex.
to the right (angular momentum down), the spins with same angular momentum
as the disc cannot rotate faster towards the Earth because they already have
the speed of light whereas the speed of spins rotating in the direction
opposite to the direction of the disc is getting lower towards the Earth.
One of the interaction is getting weaker. With the maximum rotation of the
disc the spins rotating in the opposite direction will have the zero speed
towards the Earth so their interaction with the Earth will change. The
interaction of the whole disc with the Earth will be different. Most
probably it will be enough to place it on a scales while performing this
experiment. Unfortunately my experiment was stopped by lack of appropriate
scales and problems with power supply to the drive of the disc (regulated
0-12 V and 0-5 A feeder required). I think playing with similar experiments
is worth considering. Maybe that is why the planets lie within Sun's
equatorial plane (plane of Sun's rotation) as they are pushed in this
direction and the gravitational interaction is different in the axis of
rotation and the equator.



Ad.4

The experiment described by me was once performed by two Japanese scientist:
Hideo Hayasaka and Sakae Takeuchi from the Tohoku University. The experiment
was described in the Physical Review Letters, volume 63, number 25, 18
December 1989.

Polish description was published in "Wiedza and Zycie" no 8/1990 under the
tile "Ile waza baki" (How much do the gyroscopes weigh)

In this experiment no conclusions are drawn under the explanation that the
experimental result cannot be explained by the usual theories.

The experiment was repeated and described by a group of Americans in
"Physical Review Letters" (volume 64, number 8, 19 February 1990).

In the American experiment there were no anomalies. However there were some
differences between the two experiments. In the Japanese experiment the
gyroscope was driven electrically and in the American one by means of an air
turbine so in this case there was no magnetic interference and the magnetic
interaction is the basis of my experiment.

Unfortunately I did not manage to contact any of the Japanese scientist
while I was trying to find out something more on this topic so everything
presented in this document are my own ideas and thoughts. I have not tried
to contact the Americans. I had started thinking about these things long
before the Japanese scientist performed their experiment. Of course I am
aware that my assumptions may be wrong but I guess this is the least
interesting thing in all this. People get wrong with many ideas. If you are
interested in the topic but have no access to the documents mentioned above
you can find them at my site [Only registered users see links. ] or
[Only registered users see links. ]





Regards,

Micha³ Witkowski

[Only registered users see links. ]


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  #2  
Old 11-14-2007, 01:29 AM
N:dlzc D:aol T:com \(dlzc\)
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Default Introduction to the theory of gravitation

Dear Michal Witkowski:

"Michal Witkowski" <[Only registered users see links. ]> wrote in message
news:fhdhjg$m2b$[Only registered users see links. ]...
....

Disproven by experiment.

....

But this "approximation" fails other experiments.


Yes. That level is identically zero, just as with domains in
iron.

Meaning increasing mass (bar magnets), attraction decreases.

DOA.

David A. Smith


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  #3  
Old 11-14-2007, 01:29 AM
N:dlzc D:aol T:com \(dlzc\)
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Introduction to the theory of gravitation

Dear Michal Witkowski:

"Michal Witkowski" <[Only registered users see links. ]> wrote in message
news:fhdhjg$m2b$[Only registered users see links. ]...
....

Disproven by experiment.

....

But this "approximation" fails other experiments.


Yes. That level is identically zero, just as with domains in
iron.

Meaning increasing mass (bar magnets), attraction decreases.

DOA.

David A. Smith


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  #4  
Old 11-14-2007, 05:24 PM
Michal Witkowski
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Default Introduction to the theory of gravitation

>

can you tell me what experiment you mean, who performed it and when, where can I find its description ?
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  #5  
Old 11-14-2007, 05:24 PM
Michal Witkowski
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Posts: n/a
Default Introduction to the theory of gravitation

>

can you tell me what experiment you mean, who performed it and when, where can I find its description ?
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