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Weight i.e gravity acting on phantom (missing) limb

Weight i.e gravity acting on phantom (missing) limb - Physics Forum

Weight i.e gravity acting on phantom (missing) limb - Physics Forum. Discuss and ask physics questions, kinematics and other physics problems.


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  #1  
Old 08-31-2007, 03:55 AM
neo
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Default Weight i.e gravity acting on phantom (missing) limb



I added 3 sentences regarding this subject to wikipedia article...

[Only registered users see links. ]

And I justified my changes on discussion page of this article as
follow.

----------------------
I have searched google, yahoo to find whether the amputees feel weight
of phantom limb. I have used all possible keywords and I have used
advance search options to search exact phrase like ''weight of phantom
limb'', ''weight of missing limb'', ''weight of phantom hand'',
''weight of phantom leg'', ''gravity acting on phantom limb'' etc.

Only the phrase ''weight of missing limb'' yields some results and
those are my own posts on usenet.

The average reader may 'assume' that as amputees feel pains, touch,
cold etc in phantom limb, they must be feeling 'weight of phantom
limb'. This is obvious because in everyday life we feel weight of real
hand alongwith pains, touch, cold, heat etc.

But research on phantom limb talks only about things like pains, touch
in phantom limb. The astronaut does also feel such senses in space but
he does not feel weight of hand like we do on earth.

The question is - if the limb of astronaut is amputed in space, will
he feel exactly same way the amputees on earth? Will he feel weight of
his amputed limb in space?

I think these questions are important for understanding neuroscience
and our universe. Hence I have added three sentences in article
'phantom limb'. If this problem is addressed in some scientific paper
or in some reliable source, I would request you to cite the source so
that average reader gets correct information about phantom limb
syndrome.

Thanks.

----------------------

Someone, who claims that he is working with famous neuroscientist V
Ramachandran, undid my changes without clarification. May be he did
not read discussion page. I undid his change again with following
clarification.

----------------------
It is again to make clear the question whether amputees feel weight of
missing limb.

1. We, on earth, do feel weight of real hand or leg alongwith pains,
touch, cold etc.

2. Astronauts in space do NOT feel weight of real hand or leg but they
do feel pains, touch, cold etc.

Current research talk about only phantom pains but is silent about
phantom gravity acting on phantom mass of phantom limb so that
amputees feel phantom weight.

Average reader may 'assume' that amputee on earth do feel weight of
phantom limb and amputed astronaut in space do not feel weight of
phantom limb. But this is just assumption. As a reader, I want
scientific evidence.

And I am not asking irrelevent information. Bang your leg on wall. You
will feel pains. But at the same time you also feel weight of leg.

And as written earlier, I have searched whole internet. I think, it is
justified to make it clear to reader that current research is silent
on this subject.
----------------------.

I just don't understand why the whole research is silent on this
subject. If our brain can produce phantom gravity, then it can change
the way we look at our universe.

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  #2  
Old 09-01-2007, 03:48 AM
Immortalist
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Default Weight i.e gravity acting on phantom (missing) limb

On Aug 30, 8:55 pm, neo <[Only registered users see links. ]> wrote:

If you stand on your head you feel the pressure of parts of the body
being pulled down by gravity. But centripital force can do the same,
if you spin someone around by the feet they will feel pressure on
parts of the body pulling out. This works in space without gravity.
The mass of the body in motion creates momentum and thus astronauts
can feel something like centripital force in space. ...like when
noticing that you have moved a bit in a chair after setting for a long
time in one position.

Good question though but I think the sense of gravity is a sense of
the body being pulled this eay or that. When you go around a corner in
a car you don't feel gravity but centripital force.



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  #3  
Old 09-01-2007, 03:48 AM
Immortalist
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Default Weight i.e gravity acting on phantom (missing) limb

On Aug 30, 8:55 pm, neo <[Only registered users see links. ]> wrote:

If you stand on your head you feel the pressure of parts of the body
being pulled down by gravity. But centripital force can do the same,
if you spin someone around by the feet they will feel pressure on
parts of the body pulling out. This works in space without gravity.
The mass of the body in motion creates momentum and thus astronauts
can feel something like centripital force in space. ...like when
noticing that you have moved a bit in a chair after setting for a long
time in one position.

Good question though but I think the sense of gravity is a sense of
the body being pulled this eay or that. When you go around a corner in
a car you don't feel gravity but centripital force.



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  #4  
Old 09-03-2007, 08:25 AM
nottoooily@hotmail.com
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Default Weight i.e gravity acting on phantom (missing) limb

On Aug 31, 3:55 pm, neo <[Only registered users see links. ]> wrote:


It sounds like one of the millions of holes in medical research that
nobody has filled yet. I suppose it would be interesting if he started
to feel weight in the phantom limb while the rest of his body was
weightless. But then which way would it be pulled? If he's standing
against a wall, will it be pulled towards his feet like he's standing,
or toward the wall like he's lieing down? I seems like feeling gravity
will lead to contradictions, so perhaps its possible to make a
conclusion without any actual experiments?





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  #5  
Old 09-03-2007, 08:25 AM
nottoooily@hotmail.com
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Default Weight i.e gravity acting on phantom (missing) limb

On Aug 31, 3:55 pm, neo <[Only registered users see links. ]> wrote:


It sounds like one of the millions of holes in medical research that
nobody has filled yet. I suppose it would be interesting if he started
to feel weight in the phantom limb while the rest of his body was
weightless. But then which way would it be pulled? If he's standing
against a wall, will it be pulled towards his feet like he's standing,
or toward the wall like he's lieing down? I seems like feeling gravity
will lead to contradictions, so perhaps its possible to make a
conclusion without any actual experiments?





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