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Center of Gravity of Brain

Center of Gravity of Brain - Physics Forum

Center of Gravity of Brain - Physics Forum. Discuss and ask physics questions, kinematics and other physics problems.


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  #1  
Old 05-24-2007, 02:35 PM
neo
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Default Center of Gravity of Brain



Anybody knows centre of gravity of human brain? As the mass of
neocortex is 76% of total mass of human brain, center of gravity of
human brain should be somewhere in neocortex.

I searched web, groups but can't find answer.

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  #2  
Old 05-24-2007, 03:28 PM
r norman
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Default Center of Gravity of Brain

On 24 May 2007 07:35:39 -0700, neo <[Only registered users see links. ]> wrote:


Why would this be of any interest?

In any event, the brain is very roughly speaking rather symmetrically
distributed and more or less uniform in density so the center of
gravity would be right in the center. Certainly on the midline and
therefore not in the neocortex at all.

Yes, I know there are asymmetries but these are very minor. And there
are differences in density between the gray and white matter and there
are ventricles but these are also more or less symmetrically
distributed.
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  #3  
Old 05-24-2007, 03:28 PM
r norman
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Default Center of Gravity of Brain

On 24 May 2007 07:35:39 -0700, neo <[Only registered users see links. ]> wrote:


Why would this be of any interest?

In any event, the brain is very roughly speaking rather symmetrically
distributed and more or less uniform in density so the center of
gravity would be right in the center. Certainly on the midline and
therefore not in the neocortex at all.

Yes, I know there are asymmetries but these are very minor. And there
are differences in density between the gray and white matter and there
are ventricles but these are also more or less symmetrically
distributed.
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  #4  
Old 05-24-2007, 04:21 PM
kenshin.hemora@gmail.com
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Default Center of Gravity of Brain

I agree .

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  #5  
Old 05-24-2007, 04:21 PM
kenshin.hemora@gmail.com
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Default Center of Gravity of Brain

I agree .

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  #6  
Old 05-24-2007, 04:51 PM
Benjamin
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Default Center of Gravity of Brain

"neo" <[Only registered users see links. ]> wrote in message
news:1180017338.994303.280440@o5g2000hsb.googlegro ups.com...
| Anybody knows centre of gravity of human brain? As the mass of
| neocortex is 76% of total mass of human brain, center of gravity of
| human brain should be somewhere in neocortex.
|
| I searched web, groups but can't find answer.

Caveat: Everything I will discuss in this post
is from my own work, which has not yet been
accepted by Professionals in Neuroscience.

The "biological mass" that I've been writing
about in my posts in b.n are not completely
the same as 'mass" as the term is used in
Physics.

"Biological mass" is a term I coined to connote
the net microscopic trophic modifications that
occur as a result of the neural activation.

These "micro-mods" [for short] are physically-
real stuff that exerts physically-real inertia
within neural dynamics, including cognition
and everything else to which folks commonly
refer to as "being manifestations of brain
function.

It's in these inertial dynamics that "biological
mass" is exactly analogous to physical "mass",
but the former exerts its inertia within neural
dynamics.

When one "learns" it's be-cause one has
acquired "biological mass" with respect to
that which one has "learned". We send our
Children to school to to have their nervous
system modified through the acquisition of
"biological mass" :-]

When our Children can do 'new' stuff upon
their completion of, say, a term in school,
it's be-cause the "biological mass" they
acquired as a result of the neural activation
that occurred while they were paying-attention
in class is exerting physically-real inertia
'within' their cognitive dynamics [the net
result is dependent upon 'time' spent in
"sleep" 'states, but that's beyond the scope
of this post.]

Both "biological mass" and physical "mass"
reduce to 3D-Energydynamics in the work
I've been discussing in b.n.

But, while one can "weigh" physical mass
on a balance, 'weighing' "biological mass"
happens 'within' nervous systems -- as in
the "weighing" of alternatives, only the
'weighing' literally happens 'within' the
neural Topology.

In the not too distant future, I expect that
"biological mass" will be observable via
external monitoring devices. [I've discussed
a technique, SD-EEG [Simultaneous Diff-
erential Electro EncephloGram] through
which this 'weighing' of "biological mass"
can be crudely achieved [long-former dis-
cussions], and there are a lot of other
already-existing monitoring devices that
can be used in the 'same' way. The im-
portant thing is to render the neural-activ-
ation "differentials" concrete. They correlate
to "biological mass" be-cause "biological
mass" does, in fact, exert its inertia 'within'
neural-activation dynamics.

Anyway, that's the 'difference' between
"biological mass" and physical "mass".

They're pretty-much the same-stuff, but
biological mass requires, and happens
in, nervous systems.

To see the 'same'-ness, one has to work
at the 'level' of the 3D-E to which I referred
above.

There's real usefulness in doing so.

k. p. collins



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  #7  
Old 05-24-2007, 04:51 PM
Benjamin
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Posts: n/a
Default Center of Gravity of Brain

"neo" <[Only registered users see links. ]> wrote in message
news:1180017338.994303.280440@o5g2000hsb.googlegro ups.com...
| Anybody knows centre of gravity of human brain? As the mass of
| neocortex is 76% of total mass of human brain, center of gravity of
| human brain should be somewhere in neocortex.
|
| I searched web, groups but can't find answer.

Caveat: Everything I will discuss in this post
is from my own work, which has not yet been
accepted by Professionals in Neuroscience.

The "biological mass" that I've been writing
about in my posts in b.n are not completely
the same as 'mass" as the term is used in
Physics.

"Biological mass" is a term I coined to connote
the net microscopic trophic modifications that
occur as a result of the neural activation.

These "micro-mods" [for short] are physically-
real stuff that exerts physically-real inertia
within neural dynamics, including cognition
and everything else to which folks commonly
refer to as "being manifestations of brain
function.

It's in these inertial dynamics that "biological
mass" is exactly analogous to physical "mass",
but the former exerts its inertia within neural
dynamics.

When one "learns" it's be-cause one has
acquired "biological mass" with respect to
that which one has "learned". We send our
Children to school to to have their nervous
system modified through the acquisition of
"biological mass" :-]

When our Children can do 'new' stuff upon
their completion of, say, a term in school,
it's be-cause the "biological mass" they
acquired as a result of the neural activation
that occurred while they were paying-attention
in class is exerting physically-real inertia
'within' their cognitive dynamics [the net
result is dependent upon 'time' spent in
"sleep" 'states, but that's beyond the scope
of this post.]

Both "biological mass" and physical "mass"
reduce to 3D-Energydynamics in the work
I've been discussing in b.n.

But, while one can "weigh" physical mass
on a balance, 'weighing' "biological mass"
happens 'within' nervous systems -- as in
the "weighing" of alternatives, only the
'weighing' literally happens 'within' the
neural Topology.

In the not too distant future, I expect that
"biological mass" will be observable via
external monitoring devices. [I've discussed
a technique, SD-EEG [Simultaneous Diff-
erential Electro EncephloGram] through
which this 'weighing' of "biological mass"
can be crudely achieved [long-former dis-
cussions], and there are a lot of other
already-existing monitoring devices that
can be used in the 'same' way. The im-
portant thing is to render the neural-activ-
ation "differentials" concrete. They correlate
to "biological mass" be-cause "biological
mass" does, in fact, exert its inertia 'within'
neural-activation dynamics.

Anyway, that's the 'difference' between
"biological mass" and physical "mass".

They're pretty-much the same-stuff, but
biological mass requires, and happens
in, nervous systems.

To see the 'same'-ness, one has to work
at the 'level' of the 3D-E to which I referred
above.

There's real usefulness in doing so.

k. p. collins



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  #8  
Old 05-24-2007, 05:10 PM
neo
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Posts: n/a
Default Center of Gravity of Brain


r norman wrote:

As we know, center of gravity of any body is not 'real'. No one can
see it by using any method. But it still does exist! Likewise no one
can see 'self' but it still does exist. So I thought that there might
be some relation between 'center of gravity of brain' and 'self'.

And as you pointed out that center of gravity of brain may vary from
person to person due to 'minor asymmetries', may be that is the reason
why every person has different 'self'.

BTW, I tried it many times to figure out exact location from where my
thoughts arise but it seems it is everywhere in my skull. May be it is
in frontal lobe.

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  #9  
Old 05-24-2007, 05:10 PM
neo
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Center of Gravity of Brain


r norman wrote:

As we know, center of gravity of any body is not 'real'. No one can
see it by using any method. But it still does exist! Likewise no one
can see 'self' but it still does exist. So I thought that there might
be some relation between 'center of gravity of brain' and 'self'.

And as you pointed out that center of gravity of brain may vary from
person to person due to 'minor asymmetries', may be that is the reason
why every person has different 'self'.

BTW, I tried it many times to figure out exact location from where my
thoughts arise but it seems it is everywhere in my skull. May be it is
in frontal lobe.

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  #10  
Old 05-24-2007, 11:39 PM
jer0en
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Posts: n/a
Default Center of Gravity of Brain

Except for this universal creep who introduces new universal conception in a
cogno-dynamical attempt to establish the subject as being completely
objective, and thus feloneously kill the metaphysical subject, and therewith
the concept of life itself, you should all be reading A.E. Van Vogt if you
want anything near an answer to this and more. Sadly it's all still under
copyright (you have to be dead for 50 years for it to become public property
at last) and since nobody still publishes it, you cannot buy it anymore,
except then in second hand bookstores, under SF.

Among a few other things, there's two things that I've learned in life, that
is to

A. never get out of the boat

B. never underestimate the pertinence of the stories of A.E. Van Vogt
written during WW2 as to current scientific issues, and to the brain in
particular

But basicly it would be time. You need time to have things sink in, and
additional time to comtemplate things, but the heft of it would be just
time. BTW, the centre of mine is missing, it wouldn't happen to be in your
head or would it? In that case we would be having brain salad surgery trying
to dig it out.


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