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Turned off science

Turned off science - Physics Forum

Turned off science - Physics Forum. Discuss and ask physics questions, kinematics and other physics problems.


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Old 06-17-2005, 10:03 PM
SKS
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Default Turned off science



With reference to Jai's earlier post, here are a few more on that issue, or
nearabouts:

1. Turned off science
[Only registered users see links. ]

2. Only dead scientists are known to teens
[Only registered users see links. ]

3. Science dull and hard, pupils say
[Only registered users see links. ]

4. Education: Science - in safe hands?
[Only registered users see links. ]

5. Young people are often turned off science
[Only registered users see links. ]

6. No antidote to science phobia
[Only registered users see links. ]


Respective Texts below:

1. Turned off science

By Sandra Lilley
News planning editor
NBC News
Updated: 3:35 p.m. ET June 3, 2005

Sandra Lilley
News planning editor

The battle over teaching evolution is raging in communities across the
country, but the headlines rarely focus on the "quiet" impact of this
controversy.

Science is becoming a political "hot potato" for some students -
transforming what should be a dynamic, fascinating topic into a total
turn-off. And some students are choosing silence over losing a prom date.

"Children are very much worried about their place in the world. Some
students only ask me about evolution privately, after class," said Wes
McCoy, PhD, who teaches Genetics, Biology and Astronomy at North Cobb High
School in Kennessaw, Ga.

McCoy, who has won the Georgia "Outstanding Biology Teacher" award, is
active in his Presbyterian church and also serves on the National Executive
Board of the Presbyterian Association on Science, Technology and the
Christian faith, is saddened by what he has seen in his classroom.

"Students face consequences if they choose to accept evolution in a
family or a church or a community that patently rejects evolution ... It
might affect whether you get a date to the prom, or whether you get that
summer job or not," McCoy said. "You may even anger close family members.
Conversations about evolution can make family reunions very tense."

And at a time when the National Science Foundation projects that the
number of scientists and engineers reaching retirement age is expected to
triple in the next 10 years, McCoy and others argue that the "evolution
wars" are taking time away from their life's work - making these children
excited and prepared - to become the next Jonas Salk or Bill Gates.

Science politicized
The town of Kennessaw, where McCoy teaches, is part of Cobb County,
Ga. It was in Cobb County that a U.S. district judge recently ruled against
the "evolution is just a theory" disclaimer sticker, which had been placed
on science textbooks by the local school board.

So is this a "victory" for the educators, who argued against the
stickers in federal court?

"The decision to place stickers on the books already reflects an
unfortunate politicization of science," said Brown University professor
Kenneth Miller, the co-author of"Biology," the textbook that had the
stickers removed.

"Clearly the right thing to do was to remove those stickers and treat
evolution as any other subject. But in a sense it has already done damage to
science teaching by implying that evolution is especially weak and
especially shaky, when it reality it is neither," Miller said.

Clare McKinney teaches biology and zoology at Jefferson High School in
Lafayette, Indiana. She is also a Christian who has been on national news
defending the teaching of evolution in the classroom.

McKinney explained why the debate over evolution versus creationism is
appealing - and important - to children in her classes.

"For kids this age, fairness is a real issue. Many children, who are
not even familiar with the sound evidence surrounding evolution, signed
petitions to 'include' intelligent design because it seemed 'fair,'" said
McKinney. That said, she also understands the pressure these children feel
to "reconcile" their beliefs with science - she went through it herself.

According to McKinney, interested students have waited until they are
outside the classroom to discuss what they perceive as "conflicting" views.
"I have flat out told students that the more I know about science, the more
glorious God seems," said McKinney.

She stresses in her classroom that "science is not out to prove the
presence or absence of God - whatever you believe, it's OK," adding, "You
can almost see the anxiety level diminish when I say that."

A unified theory
But what concerns educators like Miller is whether this politicization
of basic science dissuades children from going into the field.

Miller, an enthusiastic Catholic who wrote the book "Finding Darwin's
God: A Scientist's Search for Common Ground between God and Evolution,"
finds this troubling.

"Science is the one thing that is universal across cultures.and yet
[after the evolution debates] some children in this country are seeing
science as a potential minefield," explained Miller.

"We are at a disadvantage if we don't teach kids evolution, because
it's
the one unified theory that can explain everything from antibiotic
resistance to pesticide resistance over time," Miller said. "If a child
becomes a pharmacist and someone develops a resistance to a drug, that is
evolution. We have to be able to teach it well."

© 2005 MSNBC Interactive

--------------------------------------------------------------------

2. Only dead scientists are known to teens

Rebecca Smithers, education editor
Friday June 17, 2005

Guardian

Teenagers are so out of touch with modern science that they cannot name a
single living scientist, a survey reveals today.

Environmentalist and broadcaster David Bellamy was the closest that two out
of almost 1,000 respondents got. Others cited Madonna, Chemical Ali,
Leonardo da Vinci and Christopher Columbus. Some students even plumped for
their science teachers.

Students, aged 13-16, were asked to name a famous scientist in an online
survey carried out by exam board OCR. Isaac Newton (39%) and Albert Einstein
(29%) topped the list, which included Marie Curie, Charles Darwin and
Alexander Fleming; but the students were stumped when it came to naming
living scientists.

The findings also reveal that although eight out of 10 students (79%) said
scientists were clever, just 7% said they were "cool or fun". Over half
(51%) said they thought science lessons were boring, confusing or
difficult - feelings that intensified as students progressed through
secondary school in years 9, 10 and 11.

Students also resented the fact that science is compulsory, with many
wishing to drop it at GCSE. If given the choice, 45% of students would take
biology GCSE, 32% chemistry, 29% physics, 19% combined science and 16% would
opt out altogether. Clara Kenyon, OCR's director of general assessment,
said: "The results go to show the growing apathy in today's students about
science ... It is startling that no students named those responsible for
recent scientific advances, for example, Ian Wilmut, who cloned Dolly the
sheep, or Professor Colin Pillinger, who headed the Beagle 2 space probe to
Mars project.

"If we can't enthuse and inspire young people about the subject while they
are at school, then who will carry on [Britain's] great tradition of
scientific discovery?

"Universities are reporting falling numbers of science students and there is
a widely reported shortage of science teachers and lab technicians."

OCR is offering GCSEs from September designed to help students understand
science by touching on everyday subjects such as mobile phone technology and
cloning.

Ms Kenyon said she was encouraged "that unprompted, over one-third (39%) of
students stated the best thing about studying science was taking part in
practical experiments, with 24% telling us the best aspect of science for
them was gaining knowledge.

"Students may not see science as interesting, but they appreciate that it
will be relevant to their future."

EducationGuardian.co.uk © Guardian Newspapers Limited 2005

----------------------------------------------------------------------

3. Science dull and hard, pupils say

Last Updated: Thursday, 16 June, 2005, 23:37 GMT 00:37 UK

Science dull and hard, pupils say

Scientists were seen by most pupils as clever

Some 51% of teenagers think science lessons are boring, confusing or
difficult, a survey suggests.

Figures from the OCR exam board, which interviewed 950 children aged
13 to 16 in England, showed 7% thought people working in the area were
"cool".

The number of pupils choosing to study physics and chemistry at school
and university level is falling.

According to the survey, some children thought singer Madonna and
explorer Christopher Columbus were scientists.

Giving up

When asked to name a famous scientist, 39% suggested Isaac Newton and
29% Albert Einstein.

Also on the list were Marie Curie, Charles Darwin and Alexander
Fleming.

The survey reveals that 79% of pupils associated scientists with being
clever.

The children were asked if they would study science subjects if they
were not compulsory.

Some 45% said they would take biology, 32% chemistry, 29% physics and
19% combined science.

But 16% would not choose any of them.

Clara Kenyon, director of general assessment at OCR, said: "The
results go to show the growing apathy in today's students about science and
their ignorance of modern day achievements.

"It is startling that no students named those responsible for recent
scientific advances, for example, Ian Wilmut who cloned Dolly the sheep or
Professor Colin Pillinger who headed the Beagle 2 space probe to Mars
project."

OCR is launching a different type of science GCSE from next year,
which it says will encourage more involvement with modern topics such as
cloning or mobile phone technology.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------
Comments by readers:

Is it fair for pupils to say school science is boring, confusing or
difficult? What can be done to make lessons more interesting for pupils?
Send us you comments using the form below.

Science IS easy. The problem is pupils are not arriving with the
appropriate skills (eg. decent level of maths [particularly mental
arithmetic and equation skills] and logical analysis skills) and the subject
is dull and watered down with lots of irrelevant side issues (nothing to get
them excited to want to learn WHY something works). To be a scientist you
have to be able to comprehend and want to comprehend.
David, UK

Science in schools is now boring because the kids are no longer
allowed to do or see anything interesting. The health and safety brigade
have stopped every interesting experiment or demonstration being carried out
and the kids have to learn everything from a book. Plus as Philip Copeland
points out you can earn more on the checkout in Tesco than you can working
in a lab. Plus in Tesco you don't spend your life working on short term
contracts.
Paul, Scotland

To echo many of the comments, a pay commensurate with the time and
effort put in to become an experienced scientist would make science a lot
more interesting, at least to researchers like me.
Bernard, Parma, Italy

Why bother to study difficult science subjects such as chemistry,
physics etc in order to become a scientist when you can study easier
business/management degrees and become a scientist's boss on a much higher
wage?
Disgruntled Scientist, Herts, England

Are the happiest societies in the world the ones that are most
scientifically advanced? I doubt it... The things that bring joy to me
personally are the subtleties of a great novel, the intricacies of a
masterful musical composition, or the imagination behind an inspired work of
art. It's appreciation of these things that I would rather see focused on in
our schools - I applaud the 16% of our kids that would choose not to do any
science!
Stevan Anastasoff, Birmingham, UK

Why suddenly everything has to be fun? Kids are superficial and often
can't recognise what's really good to know until they're, most of the time,
too old to learn that again. I wish my parents insisted more on me learning
some things when I was a kid. Sometimes kids first have to learn something,
later they'll learn to love it. Of course, without good teachers who also
love and understand what they teach this can't be done.
Igor, Dublin, Ireland

I feel one problem is the inability of some science teachers to
properly communicate what they are teaching since they don't understand it
properly themselves. Biologists are often made to teach physics and science
GCSE teachers have often only studied up to A-level standards, for instance.
If you don't understand something fully yourself then how can you expect to
teach and inspire children about it?
Paul, Edinburgh, UK

Science is not difficult or boring. The curriculum and way it is
taught is bad. My son was recently 'taught' about the internal combustion
engine using nothing more than a blackboard - not a model, not an engine,
not anything useful in sight. He has also just been taught about CFC's and
global warming!
Dave, England

I gave maths and physics coaching (in Australia) to final year school
students for 5 years, while I was studying engineering. After I'd finished
that job, I asked my boss what the students at the coaching college went on
to study later at University. He told me that 95% of the (scores of)
students that I had taught went on to study either medicine or law and that
they only studied maths/science at school because it was easy to rote-learn
and get high marks. This was in the 1980s. This situation isn't likely to
change while the brightest students avoid becoming school teachers (for
obvious reasons).
Graham Pulford, Farnborough, UK

The curriculum needs to be modernised to include things that are
of relevance for the younger generation

Jamie Muirhead, Poole, UK
I sat my GCSEs last year and the sciences were always the most mind
numbing. The science lessons themselves were generally uninspired and, as
far as I was concerned, wholly irrelevant to anything that would occur in
'real life'. I think that the curriculum needs to be modernised to include
things that are of relevance for the younger generation, otherwise the
popularity of the sciences will continue to dwindle.
Jamie Muirhead, Poole, UK

Surely this is what the top-up fees are made for? Simply reduce the
fees for these courses and more people will take them.
Huw Pendry, Bridgend, Wales

Science is fab. I am in my 30s and am about to complete an A level in
Human Biology and have really enjoyed it. I wish I had paid more attention
to science at school. I am actively encouraging my children through my
current studies to be interested and active in science and to question why
things are the way they are.
Claire Littlejohns, Torquay, Devon

Be glad - in Spain the equivalent of A level students apparently do
not do practical experiments for health and safety reasons. A Spanish
student at my son's school in Surrey revelled in the quality and content of
the science teaching here. Be wary the same approach does not come from
Europe.
Caz, Ewell, Surrey

I'm doing my GCSEs now, and I can tell you that the students know the
names of Darwin, Curie and Einstein because they're all in the syllabus, and
the other people (the Beagle man and Mr Dolly the sheep) are not. I read the
papers and interne articles, and they aren't mentioned there either. If they
receive such a lack of media attention AND are not taught in schools then
how are we expected to know them? On a related (but different) point, The
Biology exam this year had nothing to do with human biology whatsoever. The
kidney, the heart, the respiratory system are all in the syllabus and we
spent a long time learning about them, but nothing has come up. To Sharon
Kinge and James - I'm doing the Separate Science exams. It means that you
have to take an extra, harder exam in each of the three subjects, but you
get an extra GCSE and your Physics results do not affect your Biology
results etc.
Andrew Lewis, Canterbury

I graduated from Sussex Uni in the early '90s having studied Physics -
Ok - it didn't seem well respected at the time, but now I can fool anybody
and hence earn lots of money doing close to nothing! - Kids! -Stick with the
hard subjects now and reap the rewards later!
Matt, Rushden

Part of the problem is that doing difficult intellectual things is no
longer considered attractive by young people. Attractive role model
characteristics include things like being famous, being rich, showing off
that you are rich, and being popular. All pretty vacuous traits. We need to
try to change attitudes towards the rewards of undertaking difficult
personal endeavours, that will not bring 'bling' or fame. Parents - limiting
telly watching time to 1 or 2 hours per day would assist greatly in this ...
BS McIntosh, Milton Keynes, UK

Who says science/engineering is boring - try law!
Ken Poole, Buckingham, UK

When in the late 70s I studied biology and Chemistry to O level, as I
was hopeless at mathematics, due to poor teaching, and hence missed physics
for the same reason, I gained A and B grades, however later went to
university to study law. How boring that was, totally unlike the way lawyers
lives are portrayed in the media. Since graduating I have worked exclusively
in engineering, on programmes such as military Radar/Arianne rocket/MRI body
scanners - I am constantly learning - Who says science/engineering is
boring - try law!
Ken Poole, Buckingham, UK

I have 3 science A levels, and a 1st class honours degree in
engineering from a good university. So, what field do I work in? I work at
the interface between business and technology rather than in a hard core
technological discipline itself, since this enables me to provide a good
standard of living for my family. Many of my colleagues took less
educationally demanding routes to get to similar positions. I do not regret
the difficult path I took to get here, and am proud of my scientific
training and thought patterns, but I can see there were far easier routes.
We will not see significant numbers of young people entering scientific
careers, or staying in them in my case, until the rewards are there - it's
that simple. This will have serious consequences for the competitive
position of UK PLC.
Alex, Swansea, UK

I'm a scientist working in medical research and agree with Philip
Copeland's comments - I assume he's a scientist! There are several points I
would like to make: firstly, these findings are not surprising - my memory
of school science (even up to A-level) is that it was poorly taught and I
suspect many of my teachers did not understand what they were teaching. In
addition, much of it was boring, irrelevant and outdated, for example, how
does endless drawing of specimens help if you are going to be a career
scientist? Secondly, science is hard - there is no way around that, but I am
sure course syllabuses could be made exciting and more relevant. Thirdly,
careers in science pay extremely poorly - we earn less than nurses, teachers
and police officers and have no job stability - we work on 2 year contracts
with no certainty of a position continuing beyond the end of the contract,
so there is no incentive to chose science because there is little point
continuing it if you're not going to do it as a career.
Lisa Clayton, Cardiff, Wales

I'm a mechanical engineering student, and regularly visit elementary
classrooms to teach kids about engineering. They enjoy it so much more if
they can build something, and then we explain why their ideas worked in
simple terms. The difficulty with science is that sometimes teachers will
only teach facts, which students memorize and that is all they know about
science. It was the hands on learning in my schooling that engaged and
continues to engage my interest, and I think it really gives students a
personal interest in science, rather than a personal interest in what grade
they will receive.
Katie, Indiana, USA

One good reason for students not being inclined to study science is
the poor salaries paid to scientists, especially at the start of their
career. Scientists are supposedly "professionals" yet are often paid the
same as a semi skilled worker. It is notable that the same employers who
bemoan the lack of Science Graduates etc coming into the workplace also
expect to pay these people low wages.
Gary Huckins, Guisborough Cleveland

School teachers, especially in state schools, seem to have lost
any passion for the subject
Tim, Bristol

Well GCSE science is pretty boring when it comes down to it. School
teachers, especially in state schools, seem to have lost any passion for the
subject, caring only for the grade results. When I did GCSE sciences my
biology teacher was the only one that really seemed to enjoy the subject. He
would go way off syllabus to explain his favourite bits, tell us funny
stories from the medical journals and give weird little facts.
Tim, Bristol

Let's get real here. Conventional GCSE and A level courses in physics
and chemistry are, for the most part, boring. I say this as a medical
graduate with 3 science A levels. I have watched my two sons trying to get
to grips with these subjects at school - they just cannot see the practical
relevance of most of the topics. I must admit that I can empathise with
this; it's difficult at the age of 15 seeing the relevance of forces,
moments and work - to take one example. The courses need to be more
practically-based, ie applied and delivered by teachers who can inspire. I
must admit, having seen the syllabus for all 10 of my son's GCSE courses,
subjects like business studies and economics look much more interesting than
the science courses. It makes me wish I had done those instead!
Dr Liz Saunders, Worthing

I'm currently reading a Physics PhD and am also working in a local
high school to try to interest kids in science. I've found that there are
few relevant, hands on experiments. We're currently running a science club
and a science fair and shockingly enough they love trying to blow the school
up or testing products to destruction! New health and safety regulations
have taken a lot of fun experiments out of the curriculum and yet there's
two whole generations above me that survived them! Science requires a lot of
effort (1% inspiration and 99% perspiration) and too many children don't
want to put any effort in at all (not just in their science lessons).

The other thing the scheme is to trying to change is the social
stereotypes. We need chemists and biologists in flashy cars and physicists
to wear less black. There are few scientists in the public view. If you look
hard enough you can find the odd science program tucked away on BBC2 but
once upon a time Tomorrow's World was on: the technologies may not have
always worked but it showed how science was developing and explained it.
Personally, I think we need a film to do for science what Indiana Jones did
for archaeology (Dr Christmas Jones in Bond 19 was a step in the right
direction but even though I'm not a "typical" physicist I draw the line at
hot-pants).
Helen, Durham, UK

Could it be that the problem lies with the fact that in primary
schools science is taught for only one and a quarter hours and that most
primary schools do not have any teachers with science degrees. To help plug
this gap we launched Mad Science for primary schools in September 2004 and
bring the type of equipment and programming that the state sector primary
schools simply do not have access to. More than five thousand children have
now enjoyed our lessons and the typical reaction is that they used to think
science was boring and now realise it is cool. We intend to launch key stage
three programmes in 2006 to keep the motivation through secondary schools.
Alan Sheridan, London, England

The sandals and socks are optional
Mark, Cambridge, UK

Yes, science is difficult. It's also beautiful and rewarding. If the
pupils voicing these gripes were to follow through my chosen subject
(theoretical physics) then they will discover mind blowing concepts greater
than any dubious chemical they may consume. The sandals and socks are
optional.
Mark, Cambridge, UK

Science is not the same as science teaching; the difficulty is how
teachers in the UK are selected, trained and promoted. Teaching is about
communicating and scientists don't often do that well, it's almost
contradictory. The solution? Train excellent communicators to teach science
and maths - ie the ability to teach should come first, not the ability to
understand science. But that won't happen in this country because teaching
has been de-professionalised and continues to be badly rewarded,
Anders Stark, Cardiff UK

I did not take any science subjects to GCE 'O' level and now regret it
as I have found in later life an active interest in science. I am glad that
my daughter enjoys science at school and college. She is now hoping to do a
genetics degree plus a foreign language. I hope that this will lead to a
rewarding career for her as she deserves this for all her effort
Roger Simpson, Stockport UK

I have just completed A levels in Chemistry, Biology and Geography all
three considered sciences. I love science. Unfortunately I feel I am unable
to pursue a career in research or lab work as how will live on £16,000 a
year gross salary and having to repay university fees?
Nicola, Belfast

Oooh, so some children don't like to sit down and learn stuff, I'd
never have thought it.... As principle Skinner said in the Simpsons: "Aaah
science, the joy of sitting down, staying quiet and paying attention"
AJ, Glasgow

Science is stereotyped as nerdy just as politics is stereotyped
as boring and art as a doss subject
Amanda Freeston, Hampshire, Farnborough

They make it sound like it is unexpected. I love Biology and Chemistry
but I am hopeless with physics. I am just starting my 2nd year of A-levels
in both Biology and Chemistry and it may not be easy but that doesn't
matter. Science is stereotyped as nerdy just as politics is stereotyped as
boring and art as a doss subject. I have been a voluntary class room
assistant for a science class and it is taught at theory level only. No
subject is interesting like that!
Amanda Freeston, Hampshire, Farnborough

What's the point in learning maths or science? In Britain you'll earn
more as an astrologist, or feng shui consultant. Or a paper-shuffling civil
servant with huge final salary pension paid for by the taxpayer.
Jason Wilkins, UK

Having spent a week in a local school encouraging pupils to consider a
career in science it does seem that most want to earn as much money as
possible with as little effort as possible. Is this really surprising given
society's current inclination towards the "fast buck" (e.g. personal injury
claims and bank loans)? As an aside, 29% say they would take physics were it
not compulsory - I'm pretty certain that 29% of students don't take physics
to A-level when given the option...
Phil, Oxford

Surely 49% of children saying that science lessons are not boring,
confusing or difficult is a great result, given that it has probably always
been the norm for a percentage children to automatically say that school
lessons are just that, just because that's what you are supposed to say if
you don't want to get labelled as a nerdy goody two-shoes. I'm sure a lot of
science teachers out there go to great lengths to try and inspire children
despite the constraints of having to teach a pretty jammed curriculum... and
after reports like this wonder why they bother. Go science teachers!
Dug, Wimbledon, UK

Well, I couldn't name either the "Dolly the Sheep" man or the head of
the Beagle mission either, and I'm interested in and follow modern science!
They just aren't pushed by the media as well-known names (the things they
did are pushed, but not the people behind them). And of course they are too
new to get into textbooks. When I did chemistry O-level in the early '70s we
did a lot of practical work and it was interesting. Not the "social effects
of chemistry", the real hands-on work. If that has been dropped in the name
of 'safety' (none of the science pupils at my school got injured, at least
when I was there!) it's not surprising that it has become dull and boring. I
applaud "Vic, UK"'s attempt to go beyond the dry syllabus and hope he is
rewarded for it (rather than punished for teaching something he's not
supposed to teach).
Chris C, Aylesbury, UK

I am 18 and I have my A level exams starting on Monday in Biology,
Chemistry, Physics and Maths. I love doing science subjects. Its great
finding how things work. It can be dull at times but all subjects can be. I
think what is needed is more entertaining science teachers in secondary
schools.
Michael Smith, South Shields, UK

Science teaching should start with the v young as a sort of Natural
Philosophy type thing so that 7-14 year olds would have a better
understanding of themselves and the world around them. They would then have
the tools to see through the pseudo science guff that is peddled to them
Rob , Plymouth

Typically it goes like this: in the main section, you get doomsayers
using studies saying that we're not taking the risks of asteroid strikes, or
drink-related health problems seriously enough. In the lifestyle section,
there's another article telling you a glass of wine a day, or the latest
fad, will help you live long into retirement. Until we get more sensible
scientific journalism which doesn't just cherry pick the most sensationalist
stories for their own commercial gain, but rather form a balanced view based
on all the evidence available (isn't that the job of a journalist?), the
general public's perception of the value of science, and interest in
following it as a career, will continue to wane.
James, London, UK

It's never really been cool to like science
Nikki , London, UK

It's never really been cool to like science, most movies and TV shows
always portray the nerds as science geeks - self image is always important
at that age so it is difficult to admit it you like geeky subjects! My uni
has a project where some of its researchers teach part time in schools to
try and portray a more exciting image of science. It's fantastic to see the
excitement and interest when students come and visit our "real" lab and take
part in very basic experiments. Most school children want to know "what's
the point?" to everything so to see science being carried out in real life
situations not just in the class room, helps inspire them to think about it
as a possible career and not just boring lessons to drop as soon as
possible! If it is any comfort to Clara Kenyon, I think that when asked to
name a famous scientist, my fellow PhD students and I would also fail to
mention Ian Wilmut and Colin Pillinger and probably name one of those the
school pupils did.
Nikki , London, UK

I was rather surprised to Clara Kenyon's surprise that people did not
name recent scientists as famous ones. Is that at all likely? I'm a
mathematics student, and know a fair amount of science, but if you ask me to
name one I am more likely to pick a historical figure. After all, it is hard
to tell who is going to be the most influential scientist when you are
living in the time. I am not surprised at all by this figure. Yes, science
is very interesting for those who get it, but to expect everyone to is to be
unduly optimistic. I do think society would be better off with everyone
having a better understanding of science, but some are just not meant to
progress any further than that.
Kieran Martin, Bath, UK

Science is not as easy as some subjects thus less people want to study
it. Science and engineering has been vital to this country and the world in
the past and will be vital in the future. I would encourage the government
to reduce the financial hurdles to home grown students in science and
engineering in those areas crucial to the economy in which too few students
are at present studying.
Keith, London

I'm not surprised. I like science and enjoyed it - completed two A
levels and currently studying it at university. But when our teacher at A
level said to us, in response to us saying the class was usually enjoyable,
"Chemistry, isn't meant to be fun!", that really killed a lot of enjoyment
in the subject. I think that's where some effort needs to be concentrated!
Josh, London

I teach GCSE physics and chemistry, having previously had a long
career in science research. The children are right; the specifications for
these subjects are tedious. The coursework is more difficult than an EU
grant application! To make it interesting (and useful) I show them things
that aren't in the proper course. Also, I think that any student who is
naturally interested in science would look for other subjects because the
GCSE is so uninspiring.

For example, there's precious little real chemistry in the chemistry
course. There's a great emphasis on safety - this should be taught
separately - and on the 'usefulness' of chemistry in society! Chemistry
should stand on its own feet. Lastly, we have academics complaining about
the lack of scientists. Well, I can tell you that it starts here at GCSE.
Incidentally, I already teach mobile phone technology, digital recording
systems (CD players etc) and photography and some food science to relieve
the monotony. And my lessons on safety are embellished with a career's
experience of lab accidents! I could go on about job prospects in science..
Vic, UK

I am now coming to the end of a very long educational road - I'm
finishing my PhD in chemistry this summer. Over the years I have been ever
more unimpressed with the overall state of science education as I have seen
more and more of the whole story. Science in schools is taught in a bitty,
'we can't do experiments in case we get sued way' resulting in a lack of
inspiration for most pupils despite some amazing teachers out there. Also,
this apathy I feel is indirectly affecting undergraduate science courses
trying to make up for lost time.
Richard, Birmingham, UK

Science is difficult and complex - that's reality
Sean Peacock, Bristol

I'm a science teacher in Bristol and this survey does not surprise me.
But that doesn't mean we need to try and "sell" science to the public and
pupils. Science is difficult and complex - that's reality. Trying to pretend
to make it anything less would be a lie. Pupils find it hard though because
they cannot concentrate and engage in the information. Look at independent
schools, why do they seem to be having success where state schools are not?
State schools have made to many concessions on making science a more
"accessible" subject.
Sean Peacock, Bristol

I graduated Royal Holloway with a degree in physics last year, and I
can tell you why university level physics and chemistry is becoming less
popular. It's because of the hundreds of degrees now available which require
no academic ability and are simply seen as 'simple' or 'easy.' Degrees
should be challenging academically, that's the very basis on which the
university system is founded. If there's the option to do virtually no work
and still emerge with a BA in Flower Arranging, a vast majority will take
it, and the core subjects will lose out.
Jason Richardson, High Wycombe, UK

Once again dumbing down in our schools has made the headlines. If you
want children interested in science exploit exciting science, such as the
new A380 and the advanced materials and modelling techniques used in its
construction or on the day we may decide to go into space remind kids that
science made it possible. Also remind them that from the clothes they wear
to the cars they drive in science made it all possible.
Chris Smith, Reading, UK

Whenever I see survey results that suggest "young people think Madonna
is a scientist" or "British youth believes that Japan is a part of Europe" I
always wonder whether the kids are just taking the mickey.
Tamara, England

So 49% of pupils don't think science lessons are boring, confusing or
difficult? That's not a bad percentage for subjects that have long been
associated with plaid shirts and pocket protectors. Hopefully the 16% of
children that don't want to choose science as a vocation will go on to be
musicians, artists, writers, bin men...
Adam McGee, Griesheim

How dreadful that something should be difficult. Mind you, in today's
society it seems that reward for hard work is on the wane and popular films
seem to delight in stereotyping science as being nerdy, so should we really
be surprised at this?
JB, Bristol, UK

In 1974 when I started my O level courses Science was not compulsory.
I never took any sciences, but most of my friends took one or more, I still
ended up with a good education & 11 O' levels. This just shows that it is
not just today's teenagers who will not a take science subject, there is
always a certain percentage who back out.
My daughter is currently taking GCSEs and loves biology and chemistry,
but hates physics. I think its really unfair that as a result of this her
grade will probably come down due to the fact that she will probably not get
good results in physics (it is a double award). Why can't they choose
science as separate subjects, if it has to be compulsory can't they have a
choice, why all three?
Sharon Kinge, Milton Keynes, Bucks

In response to Sharon Kinge's comment, there does actually exist a
triple science award, in which you take the three sciences separately, but
not all schools offer this. When I did my GCSEs I did this and had the same
thing but with Biology being my weaker subject. However, as I did them
separately, I still got As in physics and chemistry, as well as a C in
Biology. However, since then my old school has stopped offering the triple
award, and all students must now do the double, which is ridiculous.
James, Bristol

Good grief? What is this? Pandering to the instant gratification
generation? Pretty well all achievements in science have been through
determination methodology and blind luck on an approx 50:50 mix. e.g the
transistor (blood sweat and tears) and the telephone (blind luck). Nothing
in science is easy. Then again who would want to be a scientist these days
given the typical salaries in the UK for research assistants and tech staff.
Prestige is one thing, being able to feed yourself and your family
comfortably is another.
Philip Copeland, Newry, Co. Down

I think Philip Copeland has a point. It is difficult to keep up the
enthusiasm for science when salaries are so low. Also, jobs are not easiest
to find and are usually not permanent. This has not put me (or many others)
off wanting to do it, but I can see why people may opt out and go down
'safer' routes.
Tijana Blanusa, Reading

--------------------------------------------------------------------------

4. The Sunday Times - Review

May 08, 2005

Education: Science - in safe hands?

Spider-hunting and blood sampling help to equip children
for later life, says Sian Griffiths

Will held his middle finger tightly and squeezed. The
sterile lancet pierced his skin and a moment later a bead of blood oozed
out. He smeared it onto a slide, slid it under a microscope and discovered,
for the first time, that his blood group was AB+.
Will, 15, may not realise it but he is one of a few
children still able to do the kind of hands-on science that has been
outlawed by red tape and safety fears in many schools.

When Andrew Allott, Will's teacher at Shrewsbury school,
posted a call in an e-mail discussion group for schools to reintroduce
"blood practicals", his suggestion was greeted with remarks such as "mad"
and "hope you're not sued".

"No state schools are doing the blood experiment any
more," he explains - it was banned a decade ago when worries about HIV
infection were at their height.

So when he decided to do it at Shrewsbury, a boys'
boarding school, he felt like he was "putting his head on the block".

But now it looks like Allott, a calm enthusiast who lets
pupils handle tarantulas in his lab and takes them on trips to track rare
species in the rainforests of Honduras, may yet have the last laugh.

Boring, safe, anodyne science is switching kids off in
their thousands: numbers on A-level science courses are falling, degree
courses are unfilled, university chemistry departments are closing. If
teachers can't do interesting experiments and lessons end up "with kids
doing nothing but copying notes off the board, no surprise they are turned
off science", says Allott.

Finally, the powers that be are waking up to the problem.

Last week Sir Digby Jones, director-general of the
Confederation of British Industry warned head teachers that children must be
allowed to take risks. Jones said his worries extended to the curtailment of
the experiments and trips that made science fascinating.

"As a nation we have got to make science interesting," he
said, and turn out inquisitive children eager to explore if we want to
compete economically and technologically in the future with countries such
as India and China.

Jones is in favour of fizzing test tubes and bangs in
chemistry, the dissection of eyeballs and field trips to explore nature at
first hand.

"But if you are a science teacher who is told that if he
takes a child out on a field trip he has to spend ages filling in forms and
then - if a child does what comes naturally (God made them inquisitive) and
there is a problem - you could be sued and might even end up in prison, why
would you bother?" Allott knows first-hand just how much red tape there is.
"The blood experiment took half a day of form filling, chats with the school
doctor and permission slips to all parents," he said.

"If you are setting up a day in the hills it might take
one hour to assess the risks and fill in the forms. We have never not done
something because of risk assessment," he says. "But I can imagine other
schools thinking, 'Oh phooey, forget it'. Many schools now do not take kids
off site."

So how risky is it really? Not at all compared with the
kind of adventures Allott had as a teenager at Atlantic college in south
Wales - the ones that inspired him to spend his life teaching science. He
talks blithely of days spent on the hills and of racing dinghies in the
Bristol Channel.

But now? Have any of his pupils ever had an accident? "No,
no," he says. "Some years ago we were out on the hills in north Wales and a
boy collapsed. He was unconscious for 40 minutes. We called the Sea King
rescue helicopter and went with him to hospital."

Nobody found out why he had collapsed; he was fine
afterwards. As Allott says, the kids got to see what the RAF described as "a
textbook response" to the incident.

For, at the end of the day, life is full of risks and it's
the children who have been taught to take them safely who will triumph.

"I hope the tide will turn in favour of being able to do
exciting things safely," says Allott, already pencilling in his next school
outing: spider-hunting amid the peat bogs of an English Nature reserve in
Shropshire.

----------------------------------------------------------------------------

5. Young people are often turned off science


One of the key challenges facing our schools today is how to inspire young
people to be enthusiastic about science. Young people are often turned off
science before they even start to think about how important it has been to
our economic growth in the past, and how important it will be as we try to
address some of the major challenges that face this country in the future.
Environmental management is a key part of this future - how we manage our
natural resources that sustain life on the planet and we need the brightest
young minds to be turning their attention to these challenges if we are to
find pathways to a sustainable future.

For young people to be excited by science and by some of the scientific
challenges Australia and the world face, they need to be taught by people
who are able to communicate the excitement of science, the scientific
process and the way science can help solve real problems. Young people need
‘scientists as role models’ :- they need to see that science can be fun,
does make a difference and is a tool for change for the public good.

The ‘Teach Live’ pilot program is an innovative teaching opportunity
supported by Earthwatch Australia through funding from the Cass Foundation.
Four Victorian secondary science teachers will participate in two Australian
scientific field research projects from May 22 to June 4, 2004, and during
this time will communicate their scientific field experience back to their
students.

The program has been designed to:

a.. bring the excitement of scientific field research into the classroom
linking Earthwatch scientists and teachers with students on-line.
b.. provide teachers with intensive training in scientific fieldwork,
conservation and the use of new technologies.
c.. promote collaboration among science teachers from different schools as
classrooms participate jointly in ‘virtual’ expeditions
In pairs the teachers will join a team of international volunteers from
around the globe to assist scientists with their research. The four teachers
aim to bring the excitement of scientific field research into their
classrooms via the internet, email, and satelitte communication.

Elena Nisiforou (Glen Waverley Secondary College) and Angela Ettles (South
Oakleigh College) will participate in the Echidnas and Goannas of Kangaroo
Island research project.

Mark McTier (McKinnon Secondary College) and Cathy Nelson (Princes Hill
Secondary College) will participate in the Rainforests of Northern Australia
research project in far north Queensland.

In the lead up to the fieldwork commencing the four teachers have been busy
developing lesson plans and activities relating to the research project they
will be involved with. The aim has been to integrate the research project
into the school program, engaging not only their own students but other
teachers and their students as well. The ‘Teach Live’ initiative will
involve students from science, environmental science and geography classes
from Years 7 - 11.

After working all day in the field the teachers will write a daily journal
about their fieldwork, including photographs, which will be uploaded to
their website for their students to see. Students will be able to ask their
teachers questions about their daily activities, the scientific research and
conservation issues. The website will be an up-to-date bulletin for students
teachers and the wider school community to read about what their teachers
are doing on their projects.

-------------------------------------------------------

6. No antidote to science phobia

STUDENTS are being turned off science in their droves - but the reason
remains a mystery.

This year physics saw the biggest drop in numbers with 3% fewer pupils doing
the exam. Chemistry saw a drop off of 1.5% and biology of 0.8%.

So why is the white lab coat so uncool?

Heather Guy, acting head teacher at Whitchurch High School in Cardiff,
explained that sciences - along with maths - are perceived by students to be
that much harder.

'Students are looking to get the top grades and so feel they are more likely
to get them in subjects like media or the arts. It is a perception rather
than a reality, but that has an impact and young people tend to go for
subjects they are more likely to get an A or B in.'

Mrs Guy explained one consequence of a shortage in any subject would be felt
only too severely in teaching, where there is already a shortage in a number
of subjects, something the National Assembly has tried to address by
offering financial incentives.

Prof Richard Joyner, chair of Save British Science, and dean of research and
graduate studies at Nottingham Trent University, would love to know the
reason behind the fall in interest in science. But he explained it is a
trend that is being seen all over western Europe.

'I don't think anyone is terribly sure why that is. One possible reason is
that kids tend to hold science responsible for environmental damage,' he
explained.

With opposition to the MMR jab, BSE, cloning and GM crops all having hit the
headlines, Prof Joyner said that science 'may have had a bad press'.

'It's certainly true of society that we take all of the benefits of science
for granted.'

Should the trend continue, however, Prof Joyner warned that the UK will find
it increasingly difficult to compete in different markets, because so much
industry around the world depended on science and technology.

Story from REDNOVA NEWS
---------------------------------------------------------









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  #2  
Old 06-17-2005, 10:35 PM
Dr. Jai Maharaj
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Turned off science

Dhanyavaad for posting it.

Jai Maharaj
[Only registered users see links. ]
Om Shanti

In article <fNHse.5969$[Only registered users see links. ].pas.earthlink. net>,
"SKS" <[Only registered users see links. ]> posted:


[ Subject: MODERN SCIENCE ALIEN TO BRIT TEENS
[ From: Dr. Jai Maharaj
[ Date: Fri, 17 Jun 2005

Modern science alien to teens

UPI
Friday, June 17, 2005

London - British teenagers are so out of touch with
modern science they think Madonna, Chemical Ali and
Christopher Columbus are living scientists.

In a survey of 1,000 teenagers released Friday,
environmentalist and broadcaster David Bellamy was the
closest that two of those surveyed could name, the
Guardian reported.

The students, ages 13 to 16, were asked to name a famous
scientist in an online survey but only the dead ones
figured prominently. Isaac Newton was named by 39 percent
while Albert Einstein was named by 29 percent. The
students were stumped when it came to naming living
scientists.

More than half of the respondents thought science lessons
were boring, confusing or difficult. They also resented
that science is compulsory.

The results go to show the growing apathy in today's
students about science ... It is startling that no
students named those responsible for recent scientific
advances, for example, Ian Wilmut, who cloned Dolly the
sheep, or Professor Colin Pillinger, who headed the
Beagle 2 space probe to Mars project, a survey official
said.

More at:
[Only registered users see links. ]

Jai Maharaj
[Only registered users see links. ]
Om Shanti

Hindu Holocaust Museum
[Only registered users see links. ]

Hindu life, principles, spirituality and philosophy
[Only registered users see links. ]
[Only registered users see links. ]

The truth about Islam and Muslims
[Only registered users see links. ]

The terrorist mission of Jesus stated in the Christian bible:

"Think not that I am come to send peace on earth: I came not so send
peace, but a sword.
"For I am come to set a man at variance against his father, and the
daughter against her mother, and the daughter in law against her mother in
law.
"And a man's foes shall be they of his own household.
- Matthew 10:34-36.

o Not for commercial use. Solely to be fairly used for the educational
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FAIR USE NOTICE: This article may contain copyrighted material the use of
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go to: [Only registered users see links. ]
If you wish to use copyrighted material from this article for purposes of
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Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 06-17-2005, 11:01 PM
Uncle Al
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Turned off science

SKS wrote:

1) His name is Jay Stevens
2) He runs an astrology scam in Hawaii
3) He is a piece of shit loathsome chronic Usenet abuser

<http://www.geocities.com/drjosemariachi/jay_faq.html>

Hawaii State Judiciary (corrected link - look up Jay Stevens)
<http://hoohiki2.courts.state.hi.us/jud/Hoohiki/main.htm>
3:30 a.m. to 12:00 midnight, Hawaii Standard Time
[Only registered users see links. ]

Monkey with a keyboard idiot troll Jay Stevens. Send complaints plus
attach abusive posts to his ISP.

Jay Stevens is not merely an offensive laughingstock, he has been a
stinking ulcerous rotting Usenet wound for more than a decade. 13,900
posts on the subject and every one of them labels Jay Stevens as a
loathsome asshole. Put a plug in it. Forward each of his posts to
his ISP with a complaint.

Still the lying coward, Stevens? Still fancy yourself an East Indian,
Stevens? Your "doctorate" came from a diploma mill - and you were
overcharged. Hey stoooopid, why do you troll your own idiot
newsgroup? There is nothing about you except stooopidity, lies, and
hate.

[Only registered users see links. ] [Only registered users see links. ]
[Only registered users see links. ]
[Only registered users see links. ]
[Only registered users see links. ]
[Only registered users see links. ]
[Only registered users see links. ]
[Only registered users see links. ]
[Only registered users see links. ]
[Only registered users see links. ]
[Only registered users see links. ]

<http://www.diabetes-forums.com/diabetes/Jay_Stevens_aka_Jai_Maharaj_attacks_Beav__nothing_ to_do_with_Dennis_Fetters_231640.html>

Jay Stevens (Jai Mirage, Jai Maharaj) is one of the founding officers
(the other being Joan Miller) of Mantra Corporation, which was
incorporated in Hawaii on November 30, 1990 issued 1000 shares. It's
an astrology scam masquerading as a business consulting and marketing
outfit, with 2 shareholders.

His business phone was (808) 948-4357; and his residence was in
Honolulu, zip code 96817, at 51 Coelho Way, HI phone (808) 595-3947
and -4913.

[Only registered users see links. ]
Troll FAQ for Jai Maharaj. His given name is "Jay Stevens"
[Only registered users see links. ]
[Only registered users see links. ]
Kook of the Month for June 1995. His crap must be ended.
news:alt.bonehead.jay-stevens
news:alt.flame.jay-stevens
[Only registered users see links. ]
[Only registered users see links. ]
[Only registered users see links. ]
[Only registered users see links. ]

<http://www.google.com/groups?q=%22Jay+Stevens%22&hl=en&lr=lang_en&ie=UTF-8&as_drrb=b&as_mind=12&as_minm=5&as_miny=1981&as_m axd=22&as_maxm=9&as_maxy=2000&selm=890778936.23321 0%40iris.nyx.net&rnum=1>
<http://www.google.com/groups?q=%22Jay+Stevens%22&hl=en&lr=lang_en&ie=UTF-8&as_drrb=b&as_mind=12&as_minm=5&as_miny=1981&as_m axd=22&as_maxm=9&as_maxy=2000&selm=6ciuj3%24k36%40 ds2.acs.ucalgary.ca&rnum=2>
<http://www.google.com/groups?q=%22Jay+Stevens%22&hl=en&lr=lang_en&ie=UTF-8&as_drrb=b&as_mind=12&as_minm=5&as_miny=1981&as_m axd=22&as_maxm=9&as_maxy=2000&selm=68q17c%24jd8%40 ds2.acs.ucalgary.ca&rnum=4>
<http://www.google.com/groups?q=%22Jay+Stevens%22&hl=en&lr=lang_en&ie=UTF-8&as_drrb=b&as_mind=12&as_minm=5&as_miny=1981&as_m axd=22&as_maxm=9&as_maxy=2000&selm=888583780.26094 4%40iris.nyx.net&rnum=5>
<http://www.google.com/groups?q=%22Jay+Stevens%22&hl=en&lr=lang_en&ie=UTF-8&as_drrb=b&as_mind=12&as_minm=5&as_miny=1981&as_m axd=22&as_maxm=9&as_maxy=2000&selm=jjos001-1208972010450001%40uglc5.cs.auckland.ac.nz&rnum=10 >
<http://www.google.com/groups?q=%22Jay+Stevens%22&hl=en&lr=lang_en&ie=UTF-8&as_drrb=b&as_mind=12&as_minm=5&as_miny=1981&as_m axd=22&as_maxm=9&as_maxy=2000&selm=jjos001-2510961330310001%40news.cs.auckland.ac.nz&rnum=11>


--
Uncle Al
[Only registered users see links. ]
(Toxic URL! Unsafe for children and most mammals)
[Only registered users see links. ]
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 06-17-2005, 11:09 PM
Dr. Jai Maharaj
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Turned off science

In article <[Only registered users see links. ].net>,

NET ABUSER ALAN SCHWARTZ "Uncle Al" <[Only registered users see links. ]>
<[Only registered users see links. ].net> posted:

Dhanyavaad for posting it.

Jai Maharaj
[Only registered users see links. ]
Om Shanti

In article <fNHse.5969$[Only registered users see links. ].pas.earthlink. net>,
"SKS" <[Only registered users see links. ]> posted:


[ Subject: MODERN SCIENCE ALIEN TO BRIT TEENS
[ From: Dr. Jai Maharaj
[ Date: Fri, 17 Jun 2005

Modern science alien to teens

UPI
Friday, June 17, 2005

London - British teenagers are so out of touch with
modern science they think Madonna, Chemical Ali and
Christopher Columbus are living scientists.

In a survey of 1,000 teenagers released Friday,
environmentalist and broadcaster David Bellamy was the
closest that two of those surveyed could name, the
Guardian reported.

The students, ages 13 to 16, were asked to name a famous
scientist in an online survey but only the dead ones
figured prominently. Isaac Newton was named by 39 percent
while Albert Einstein was named by 29 percent. The
students were stumped when it came to naming living
scientists.

More than half of the respondents thought science lessons
were boring, confusing or difficult. They also resented
that science is compulsory.

The results go to show the growing apathy in today's
students about science ... It is startling that no
students named those responsible for recent scientific
advances, for example, Ian Wilmut, who cloned Dolly the
sheep, or Professor Colin Pillinger, who headed the
Beagle 2 space probe to Mars project, a survey official
said.

More at:
[Only registered users see links. ]

Jai Maharaj
[Only registered users see links. ]
Om Shanti

Hindu Holocaust Museum
[Only registered users see links. ]

Hindu life, principles, spirituality and philosophy
[Only registered users see links. ]
[Only registered users see links. ]

The truth about Islam and Muslims
[Only registered users see links. ]

The terrorist mission of Jesus stated in the Christian bible:

"Think not that I am come to send peace on earth: I came not so send
peace, but a sword.
"For I am come to set a man at variance against his father, and the
daughter against her mother, and the daughter in law against her mother in
law.
"And a man's foes shall be they of his own household.
- Matthew 10:34-36.

o Not for commercial use. Solely to be fairly used for the educational
purposes of research and open discussion. The contents of this post may not
have been authored by, and do not necessarily represent the opinion of the
poster. The contents are protected by copyright law and the exemption for
fair use of copyrighted works.
o If you send private e-mail to me, it will likely not be read,
considered or answered if it does not contain your full legal name, current
e-mail and postal addresses, and live-voice telephone number.
o Posted for information and discussion. Views expressed by others are
not necessarily those of the poster who may or may not have read the article.

FAIR USE NOTICE: This article may contain copyrighted material the use of
which may or may not have been specifically authorized by the copyright
owner. This material is being made available in efforts to advance the
understanding of environmental, political, human rights, economic,
democratic, scientific, social, and cultural, etc., issues. It is believed
that this constitutes a 'fair use' of any such copyrighted material as
provided for in section 107 of the US Copyright Law. In accordance with Title
17 U.S.C. Section 107, the material on this site is distributed without
profit to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving the included
information for research, comment, discussion and educational purposes by
subscribing to USENET newsgroups or visiting web sites. For more information
go to: [Only registered users see links. ]
If you wish to use copyrighted material from this article for purposes of
your own that go beyond 'fair use', you must obtain permission from the
copyright owner.

Since newsgroup posts are being removed
by forgery by one or more net terrorists,
this post may be reposted several times.

Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 06-17-2005, 11:30 PM
Steve Ralph
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Turned off science

**** off troll. Your junk has been seen all across the full spectrum of
usenet.

sr

"Dr. Jai Maharaj" <[Only registered users see links. ]> wrote in message
news:cUePu1423ixDxI@XwiUh...



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  #6  
Old 06-17-2005, 11:34 PM
Steve Ralph
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Turned off science




Asshole. You are universally despised, and any intelligent person
would wish to see you gone from the internet for all eternity.
I hope you manage a good sneeze soon.

Egomaniac.

sr



Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 06-17-2005, 11:42 PM
Uncle Al
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Turned off science

"Dr. Jai Maharaj" wrote:
[snip trolled crap]

STAY OUT OF SCI.CHEM AND SCI.PHYSICS IDIOT TROLL JAY STEVENS

<http://www.geocities.com/drjosemariachi/jay_faq.html>

Hawaii State Judiciary (corrected link - look up Jay Stevens)
<http://hoohiki2.courts.state.hi.us/jud/Hoohiki/main.htm>
3:30 a.m. to 12:00 midnight, Hawaii Standard Time
[Only registered users see links. ]

Monkey with a keyboard idiot troll Jay Stevens. Send complaints plus
attach abusive posts to his ISP.

Jay Stevens is not merely an offensive laughingstock, he has been a
stinking ulcerous rotting Usenet wound for more than a decade. 13,900
posts on the subject and every one of them labels Jay Stevens as a
loathsome asshole. Put a plug in it. Forward each of his posts to
his ISP with a complaint.

Still the lying coward, Stevens? Still fancy yourself an East Indian,
Stevens? Your "doctorate" came from a diploma mill - and you were
overcharged. Hey stoooopid, why do you troll your own idiot
newsgroup? There is nothing about you except stooopidity, lies, and
hate.

[Only registered users see links. ] [Only registered users see links. ]
[Only registered users see links. ]
[Only registered users see links. ]
[Only registered users see links. ]
[Only registered users see links. ]
[Only registered users see links. ]
[Only registered users see links. ]
[Only registered users see links. ]
[Only registered users see links. ]
[Only registered users see links. ]

<http://www.diabetes-forums.com/diabetes/Jay_Stevens_aka_Jai_Maharaj_attacks_Beav__nothing_ to_do_with_Dennis_Fetters_231640.html>

Jay Stevens (Jai Mirage, Jai Maharaj) is one of the founding officers
(the other being Joan Miller) of Mantra Corporation, which was
incorporated in Hawaii on November 30, 1990 issued 1000 shares. It's
an astrology scam masquerading as a business consulting and marketing
outfit, with 2 shareholders.

His business phone was (808) 948-4357; and his residence was in
Honolulu, zip code 96817, at 51 Coelho Way, HI phone (808) 595-3947
and -4913.

[Only registered users see links. ]
Troll FAQ for Jai Maharaj. His given name is "Jay Stevens"
[Only registered users see links. ]
[Only registered users see links. ]
Kook of the Month for June 1995. His crap must be ended.
news:alt.bonehead.jay-stevens
news:alt.flame.jay-stevens
[Only registered users see links. ]
[Only registered users see links. ]
[Only registered users see links. ]
[Only registered users see links. ]

<http://www.google.com/groups?q=%22Jay+Stevens%22&hl=en&lr=lang_en&ie=UTF-8&as_drrb=b&as_mind=12&as_minm=5&as_miny=1981&as_m axd=22&as_maxm=9&as_maxy=2000&selm=890778936.23321 0%40iris.nyx.net&rnum=1>
<http://www.google.com/groups?q=%22Jay+Stevens%22&hl=en&lr=lang_en&ie=UTF-8&as_drrb=b&as_mind=12&as_minm=5&as_miny=1981&as_m axd=22&as_maxm=9&as_maxy=2000&selm=6ciuj3%24k36%40 ds2.acs.ucalgary.ca&rnum=2>
<http://www.google.com/groups?q=%22Jay+Stevens%22&hl=en&lr=lang_en&ie=UTF-8&as_drrb=b&as_mind=12&as_minm=5&as_miny=1981&as_m axd=22&as_maxm=9&as_maxy=2000&selm=68q17c%24jd8%40 ds2.acs.ucalgary.ca&rnum=4>
<http://www.google.com/groups?q=%22Jay+Stevens%22&hl=en&lr=lang_en&ie=UTF-8&as_drrb=b&as_mind=12&as_minm=5&as_miny=1981&as_m axd=22&as_maxm=9&as_maxy=2000&selm=888583780.26094 4%40iris.nyx.net&rnum=5>
<http://www.google.com/groups?q=%22Jay+Stevens%22&hl=en&lr=lang_en&ie=UTF-8&as_drrb=b&as_mind=12&as_minm=5&as_miny=1981&as_m axd=22&as_maxm=9&as_maxy=2000&selm=jjos001-1208972010450001%40uglc5.cs.auckland.ac.nz&rnum=10 >
<http://www.google.com/groups?q=%22Jay+Stevens%22&hl=en&lr=lang_en&ie=UTF-8&as_drrb=b&as_mind=12&as_minm=5&as_miny=1981&as_m axd=22&as_maxm=9&as_maxy=2000&selm=jjos001-2510961330310001%40news.cs.auckland.ac.nz&rnum=11>

Registrant:
Mantra Corporation (MANTRA-DOM)
P. O. Box 1919
Honolulu
HI,96792-6919
US
1-808-521-8808

Record Type: Master Name for a Domestic Profit Corporation
File Number: 82087
D1 Status: Active
Place Incorporated: Hawaii UNITED STATES
Incorporation Date: 11/30/1990

Domain Name: MANTRA.COM
Administrative Contact:
Maharaj, Jai (JM225) [Only registered users see links. ]

(808) 581-8808
IP Address 206.126.0.13 [flex.com]

Technical Contact:
Wong, Delgory K. (DW403) [Only registered users see links. ]
FlexNet Inc.
P.O.Box 22481
HONOLULU, HI 96822-2481
US
(808) 539-3790 (808) 539-3793
Information Network 808.732.8849 HAWAII
Email: [Only registered users see links. ]
IP Address: 199.201.240.1

hindu.org Himalayan Academy
107 Kaholalele Road
Kapaa, HI 11111 US
IP Address 64.75.159.118




--
Uncle Al
[Only registered users see links. ]
(Toxic URL! Unsafe for children and most mammals)
[Only registered users see links. ]
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  #8  
Old 06-18-2005, 07:40 AM
Anthony Smales
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Turned off science

I do think the current generation (in the UK) are the 'conveinience
society' - they have grown up and become used to having everything on
demand - they take it for granted. You could think of them as the spoilt
children of previous endeavour. So if something takes a long time to learn,
they are not interested - they want instant gratification.

Why would someone with this mindset care how something works? - they don't
care about that, they just want to indulge it.

If one day (as might actually happen), we run out of power, they will not be
able to cope without the trappings of modern life. (Ok, we'd all struggle,
but these are no-hopers).

So this generation are not learning as much as their predecessors - they
lives revolve around mobile phones (responsible for bastardisation of the
english language (texting), filling the air with irritating ring-tones and
possibly physically rotting their brains (microwaves)), drug/alcohol binges
and underage pregnancies.

You only have to turn on the TV and observe their staple viewing of Big
Brother, Trisha, Jerry Springer etc.. so see what sort of level they are on.

You can't teach a chav much of anything - they are like a backward
underclass that threatens to become the norm as they grow older.


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  #9  
Old 06-18-2005, 08:30 AM
Dr. Jai Maharaj
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Turned off science

In article <[Only registered users see links. ].uk>,
"Anthony Smales" <[Only registered users see links. ]> posted:

Sadly, matters are about the same in the US and getting
that way fast in Bharat (aka India).

Jai Maharaj
[Only registered users see links. ]
Om Shanti
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  #10  
Old 06-18-2005, 12:15 PM
Steve Ralph
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Turned off science


"Anthony Smales" <[Only registered users see links. ]> wrote in message
news:[Only registered users see links. ].uk...

I have first hand experience of this having done supply teaching for several
years. Science and maths teaching in the U.K is in a deplorable state,
whoever
invented this part of the National curriculum should be put up against
a wall and shot. At last some genius has realised that serving up crap
cheap
food produces crap pupils. We are reaping the results of the systematic
neglect
of the Thatcher years.

If I hear that crazy frog theme in a classroom again I will not be
responsible for my actions!

sr





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