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Why the weight of a quart of liquid varies:

Why the weight of a quart of liquid varies: - Physics Forum

Why the weight of a quart of liquid varies: - Physics Forum. Discuss and ask physics questions, kinematics and other physics problems.


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  #1  
Old 03-13-2005, 02:10 PM
Don1
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Default Why the weight of a quart of liquid varies:



Now I know that most of you already know why the weight of a quart of
most water like liquids varies. This is for those who may not know:

The weight of a fluid quart is one pound, or 32 ounces; but only where
it will free fall at a rate of g=32'/sec^2, which is the approximate
rate of free fall due to gravity over most of Earth's surface:
Therefore the "quantity of matter", or mass in one fluid quart
numerically equals 32 oz/(32'/sec^2)=1 oz sec^2/foot.

In an environmentally controlled laboratory on the moon, a fluid quart
will only weigh about one sixth of a pound, or 5.33 ounces: Because the
acceleration of free fall (g) due to gravity there is only about one
sixth as great as it is on Earth: So that g=5.33'/sec^2. The "quantity
of matter", or mass in one fluid quart there is still numerically equal
to 5.33 oz/(5.33'/sec^2)=1 oz sec^2/foot; the same as it was on Earth.

In an environmentally controlled laboratory on any similar planet, the
quantity of matter, or mass in a fluid quart will still be 1 oz
sec^2/foot: Because its weight (w), divided by the acceleration of free
fall (g) due to gravity there will still be 1 oz sec^2/foot.

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  #2  
Old 03-13-2005, 03:58 PM
cnctutwiler@wmconnect.com
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Default Why the weight of a quart of liquid varies:

Don1

When grandma was cooking she used to mumble "A pints a pound the world
round" and of course she was measuring either milk or water. If your
quart weighs one pound (as you say) then I have to assume your not
cooking on earth.

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  #3  
Old 03-13-2005, 06:23 PM
Don1
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Default Why the weight of a quart of liquid varies:

[Only registered users see links. ] wrote:
world

You got me, but good "conn. writer"! Of course, 32 ounces is the weight
of a quart and it's _two_ pounds. _Thanks_ a mint; try:

The weight of a fluid quart is two pounds, or 32 ounces; but only where
it will free fall at a rate of g=32'/sec^2, which is the approximate
rate of free fall due to gravity over most of Earth's surface:
Therefore the "quantity of matter", or mass in one fluid quart
numerically equals 32 oz/(32'/sec^2)=1 oz sec^2/foot.

In an environmentally controlled laboratory on the moon, a fluid quart
will only weigh about one sixth of two pounds, or 5.33 ounces: Because
the acceleration of free fall (g) due to gravity there is only about
one sixth as great as it is on Earth: So that g=5.33'/sec^2. The
"quantity of matter", or mass in one fluid quart there is still
numerically equal to 5.33 oz/(5.33'/sec^2)=1 oz sec^2/foot; the same as
it was on Earth.

In an environmentally controlled laboratory on any similar planet, the
quantity of matter, or mass in a fluid quart will still be 1 oz
sec^2/foot: Because its weight (w), divided by the acceleration of free
fall (g) due to gravity there will still be 1 oz sec^2/foot.

Incidentally, this will not apply on planets that don't have a solid
terra firma surface, like Earth, the moon and Mars.

Don

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  #4  
Old 03-13-2005, 06:43 PM
cnctutwiler@wmconnect.com
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Default Why the weight of a quart of liquid varies:

Don1--not sure what "conn.writer" means--but your welcome. I'm not the
math police but since you started your discussion with...."this is for
thoughs who may not know...." I thought I'd jump in--also my wife is
out of town and I have free time.

Good luck with the after lunch crowd!

Tut

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  #5  
Old 03-13-2005, 08:25 PM
Don1
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Default Why the weight of a quart of liquid varies:

[Only registered users see links. ] wrote:
the
for

I meant no offense with the "conn.writer" monica Tut; it was just a
wild guess: I'm from Connecticut(:-))

Thanks again, Tut.

Don

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  #6  
Old 03-13-2005, 08:26 PM
Don1
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Default Why the weight of a quart of liquid varies:

[Only registered users see links. ] wrote:
the
for

I meant no offense with the "conn.writer" monica Tut; it was just a
wild guess: I'm from Connecticut(:-))

Thanks again, Tut.

Don

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  #7  
Old 03-13-2005, 08:52 PM
OG
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Default Why the weight of a quart of liquid varies:


<[Only registered users see links. ]> wrote in message
news:1110729490.193120.90040@z14g2000cwz.googlegro ups.com...

Quite apart from Don's basic problems I'm afraid your grandma would have
had trouble with her recipes in Britain where a pint is 20 oz (pound and
a quarter).


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  #8  
Old 03-13-2005, 09:11 PM
cnctutwiler@wmconnect.com
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Default Why the weight of a quart of liquid varies:

OG--great point but Don1 had established 32 oz as the reference frame
for a quart. I should have remembered on my visits to Britain though,
that a pint of your tasty ale was well worth the pound charged. Maybe
Don1 has found a bar in London that sells 32oz of ale for a pound--then
one pound would equal a quart. Hmmmm!

Thanks!

Tut

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