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Is this a math problem?

Is this a math problem? - Physics Forum

Is this a math problem? - Physics Forum. Discuss and ask physics questions, kinematics and other physics problems.


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  #1  
Old 02-21-2005, 03:11 PM
LeoK
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Default Is this a math problem?



Hi

Having thoughts about the superiority of math versus pure physics.

For to give an illustration of this we perhaps can give any standard problem
which can be solved with math and/or physics.

Problem:

Finding the common unit or link between matter and energy?



Hint:
We know in quantum physics the unit between matter and energy is that
these can be seen as synonyms, 1 eV is both a energy unit and a mass unit,
eV/c^2 is also a mass unit about roughly 1.783 × 10-36 kg.

This lot of us should take for an answer on our main problem showing the
superiority of math versus pure physics by the division of 1 eV with c^2 giving
the link between matter and energy. Matter = energy/(lightspeed * lightspeed.)

But to me the pure physics is not in an minor position to math by the finding
of another link between matter and energy which is as good as matters itself.

By the finding of another link we see that math and pure physics are equal in
the search of a answer in common physics.

So what's the link?

LeoK


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  #2  
Old 02-21-2005, 05:07 PM
Morituri-|-Max
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Default Is this a math problem?

LeoK wrote:

Get a better grasp of the english language, then repost the question here in
a concise manner that makes it possible to understand what the hell you are
saying.


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  #3  
Old 02-21-2005, 07:01 PM
ošin
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Default Is this a math problem?

> So what's the link?

It is that colorless green ideas sleep furiously. Now go away...


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  #4  
Old 02-21-2005, 10:08 PM
LeoK
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Default Is this a math problem?


"Morituri-|-Max" <[Only registered users see links. ]> skrev i meddelandet
news:KzoSd.28457$[Only registered users see links. ].com...

Well, do you know or not...?

Any other with any idea?

LeoK


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  #5  
Old 02-21-2005, 10:11 PM
LeoK
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Default Is this a math problem?


"ošin" <oš[Only registered users see links. ]> skrev i meddelandet
news:[Only registered users see links. ]...


If you don't know you don't have to answer.

LeoK


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  #6  
Old 02-21-2005, 11:04 PM
tadchem
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Default Is this a math problem?


"LeoK" <*@*.chello.se> wrote in message
news:kTmSd.2869$Mw3.1378@amstwist00...


Sentence fragment. "Superiority" means...? "Pure physics" means...?

Seriously, the word 'superior' implies a decision has been (or could be)
made regarding the relative merits of two alternatives. The 'merits' are
evaluated according to some criteria. These criteria will necessarily
depend on the application to which the two alternatives have been (or will
be) put.

Bottom line: 'superiority' is a relative and conditional term.


As 'energy' is defined in physics, the 'link' is a factor with the
dimensions of speed squared.


There is a *correspondence* based on the Principle of Relativity. This is
not the same thing as "synonyms." When mass is given in electron-Volts (eV)
it is done ONLY in applications in which some massive particle is moving at
a significant fraction of the speed of light. For example, physicists
routinely discuss the energy of a photon as so many ev, but never the *mass*
of a photon.

giving
lightspeed.)

The existence of a connection between mass and energy demonstrates the
'superiority' of math to pure physics exactly how???

finding
itself.
in

This arrangement of words demonstrates conclusively that English is not your
first language. Please, find a more competent translator for your sentences
before trying to post in English. The multiple grammatical problems here
render the sentences almost devoid of sense.


We are discussing *your* question: "Finding the common unit or link between
matter and energy?" We will need a definition of "link" which is
appropriate and acceptable in BOTH contexts before we can confront the
problem. ["Mass" and "energy" both have definitions already which are
equally satisfactory in either context.]

Choose one:
[Only registered users see links. ]

Come back when you have figured out what you want to talk about.


Tom Davidson
Richmond, VA


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  #7  
Old 02-22-2005, 03:25 AM
Morituri-|-Max
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Default Is this a math problem?

LeoK wrote:

Maybe you didn't understand what I was trying to say.. what you said is
gibberish. Write it in a manner that people can understand what you are
asking, then you might get a *serious* answer.

unnerstanny what i am sayee?


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  #8  
Old 02-22-2005, 03:26 AM
Morituri-|-Max
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Default Is this a math problem?

LeoK wrote:


Any other what?


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  #9  
Old 02-22-2005, 06:56 AM
ošin
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Default Is this a math problem?

> "ošin" <oš[Only registered users see links. ]> skrev i meddelandet

But I do know, and I did answer. So now go away.


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  #10  
Old 02-22-2005, 10:35 AM
Steve Ralph
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Default Is this a math problem?

Is this a math problem?

If this is a solution, yes.

Now go and play with Don.

SR
"tadchem" <[Only registered users see links. ]> wrote in message
news:[Only registered users see links. ]...



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