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Force defined

Force defined - Physics Forum

Force defined - Physics Forum. Discuss and ask physics questions, kinematics and other physics problems.


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  #1  
Old 12-10-2004, 04:51 AM
Don1
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Having been a bridge designer for a few years, I consider myself to be
somewhat of an expert on the nature of force and weight: For one thing,
they are what weight scales are made to measure: The weight of any
particular object; body or mass of material matter - including the
standard kilogram - varies depending on its location; but this weight
[w] divided by the acceleration [g] at which it will freefall is a
constant; equal to the net force [f] exerted on and/or it to the
acceleration [a] caused by this force: That is w/g = f/a.

Here on Earth we use one pound as the unit of both force and weight.
Most weight scales in U.S. stores are calibrated in these units, using
standard weights that are based on the weight of water; which is at its
maximum density at a temperature of 39.1 degrees F. "One pound" weights
weigh 0.0160205 as much as a cubic foot of pure water at this
temperature, and atmospheric pressure at mean sea level.

Most U.S. weight scales can be adjusted so that they can be used to
measure weight just about anywhere on Earth; but on the moon or some
such place where the acceleration of free fall [g] is much different,
weight scales must be calibrated to measure weight: Otherwise they read
the same there as anywhere; which is where people get the idea that
these scales measure "mass"; where the measure of mass is called
inertia, and is given in units of mass: Slugs; kilograms and grams;
which are not forces or weights, but are quantity units of how much
substance is contained in an object; body or mass of matter.

The Meaning of Force

A force is a push or thrust by one material object upon another
material object resulting from the fact that no two particles or
portions of a material object's matter can simultaneously occupy and/or
pass through the exact same place; instead, they displace each other;
with a mutual pushing force.

The displacement of each object is inversely proportional to their
inertia.Whenever there is contact between two objects, there is a
mutual force upon each of the objects by the other. When the
displaceement ceases, the two objects no longer experience the force.
Forces only exist as a result of thedisplaceing process. Forces include
frictional forces.

What appear to be tensile [pulling] forces are due to some sort of
entanglement, entwinement or actual hooking, molding or welding
together between particles and objects. Ropes and chains are
specifically made for pulling and wires are molded and twisted together
to increase their capacity for this purpose.

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  #2  
Old 12-12-2004, 09:43 AM
Jeremy Watts
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Default Force defined


"Don1" <[Only registered users see links. ]> wrote in message
news:1102654286.799081.327000@c13g2000cwb.googlegr oups.com...

wow the great donald g. shead is back....


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  #3  
Old 12-12-2004, 01:00 PM
Don1
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Snot rubbish dummies(:-) Rubbish is the idea that force is a pull: You
know that forces aren't pulls as well as I do; they are thrusts which
result from hooking into a substantial portion of an object; body or
mass of material matter so that it can be dragged along with rope,
chain or wire that is physically hooked to something that is capable of
exerting a thrust on the inside of that hook.

While an initial velocity - a speed and direction - is useful and
customary as a reference from which to the start a motion problem,
Newton's First Law immediately thereafter goes out the window; because
of air friction and gravity. There is noplace remote enough for that
kind of motion to occur; except in your imagination:
Even Einsteins world lines are curved because gravity is everywhere.

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  #4  
Old 12-16-2004, 03:45 PM
Don. Shead a'course
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Force is what causes motion. There are no motions that are not due to
the displacing thrusts of other bodies: Celestial motion is caused by
the impulsions of the ultramundane particles of radiation; which impel
bodies toward each other by their mutually shielding each other;
causing them to gravitate. This is what leSage's theory is about.

All moving bodies have momentum; which is the product of their speed
and inertia. A body's momentum gives it the power to thrust against and
displace bodies from where they would otherwise stay, or go, except for
being displaced.

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  #5  
Old 12-16-2004, 11:18 PM
Don. Shead a'course
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Energy is due to the expansion of matter: While human energy is
somewhat slow to cause muscular expansion, mechanical energy resulting
from combustion, friction or something else causes a flashpoint
resulting in sudden explosive expansion. These explosive expansions
proceed outward, and except for bombing, they must be constrained to do
useful work. Their thrusting power when confined by gun barrels acts
outward causing the gun barrel to recoil and the lighter projectile to
be forcefully expelled from the open end: Internal combustion engines
working on that principle have become very important to us in recent
years.

In rocket engines the thrust is exerted in all directions, and - for
the most part - only pushes on the front of the rocket; which forces it
"ahead" and the gases are expelled rearward out of an exhaust orifice;
with considerable velocity. In that respect the action and reaction do
not act on two different bodies; unless a'course you want to consider
the combustion gas as a body. There's still a lot to learn about
rockets.

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  #6  
Old 12-16-2004, 11:40 PM
lvlus@hotmail.com
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I define force as energy. Below is an excerpt from my model of the
universe, copyright 1996:

"How is it possible for waves to move through a medium without the
media having to travel along with it? We know the answer to that.
Waves are a disturbance that transfers energy progressively in a
medium, and that may take the form of an elastic deformation or of a
variation of pressure, electric or magnetic intensity, electric
potential, or temperature. Thus waves - any waves - are a progressive
transfer of energy through a medium whenever such energy is created by
a causative event.
The next question for us, then, should be: How and when does such
transfer of energy occur? The answer to that is not really as
difficult as it may seem. Energy is commonly defined as the capacity
of matter to perform work, as a consequence of its motion or position
in relation to forces acting upon it. Yet, energy is also defined as
usable power, as a vigorous exertion of power, and as a synonym for
power. Other synonyms for energy are force, strength, and might.
Power is ordinarily defined as the time rate at which work is done, but
it is also defined as the ability to act or produce an effect, and it
implies possession of the ability to wield force. Therefore, energy is
a force having the power to overcome resistance to it.
A force is ordinarily defined as any action or influence that when
applied to a free body results sometimes in an acceleration of the body
and sometimes in elastic deformation and/or other effects. Newton's
second law of motion states that the amount of acceleration imposed on
an object times the mass of the object is equal to the net force acting
on the object. We may argue that particular law refers only to
objects, but a force is also described as the influence of a field,
such as electrical and gravitational fields. A force acting at an
atomic level is known in high-energy physics as an interaction.
So-called elementary particles exert forces on each other and the
imposition of such forces are called interactions. In spite of all the
definitions above that lead to the conclusion that energy is a force, I
have met with solid opposition against such a claim from some
knowledgeable Internet users who post on physics news-groups. They
seem unwilling to accept the obvious, probably because there already
exist four other well-explained "forces of nature."(The Time And Motion
Relationship, by Thomas Garcia, [Only registered users see links. ].
TomGee 121604

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  #7  
Old 12-16-2004, 11:49 PM
Don. Shead a'course
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Default Force defined

Energy is due to the expansion of matter: While human energy is
somewhat slow to cause muscular expansion, mechanical energy resulting
from combustion, friction or something else causes a flashpoint
resulting in sudden explosive expansion. These explosive expansions
proceed outward, and except for bombing, they must be constrained to do
useful work. Their thrusting power when confined by gun barrels acts
outward causing the gun barrel to recoil and the lighter projectile to
be forcefully expelled from the open end: Internal combustion engines
working on that principle have become very important to us in recent
years.

In rocket engines the thrust is exerted in all directions, and - for
the most part - only pushes on the front of the rocket; which forces it
"ahead" and the gases are expelled rearward out of an exhaust orifice;
with considerable velocity. In that respect the action and reaction do
not act on two different bodies; unless a'course you want to consider
the combustion gas as a body. There's still a lot to learn about
rockets.

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  #8  
Old 12-17-2004, 12:05 AM
Don. Shead a'course
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Default Force defined

Well Tom, as good as your definitions are, I still say that work and
power - the time rate of doing work is more efficient if the work can
be done quickly: Then the force need not be maintained for so long.
Exerting force requires muscle or combustion, which require energy. The
shorter the force, the less the energy requirement. Isn't it?

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  #9  
Old 12-17-2004, 01:03 PM
Don. Shead a'course
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Default Force defined

In the SI system, the unit of force is the newton; not Newton.

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  #10  
Old 12-17-2004, 01:03 PM
Don. Shead a'course
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Default Force defined

In the SI system, the unit of force is the newton; not Newton.

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