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Force defined

Force defined - Physics Forum

Force defined - Physics Forum. Discuss and ask physics questions, kinematics and other physics problems.


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  #11  
Old 12-17-2004, 02:42 PM
Don. Shead a'course
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Default Force defined

Here's the way it works John:
In the SI system of weights and measures; a newton is the quantity of
force that will acelerate one kilogram of matter at a rate of one meter
per second, per second:

In the U.S. customary system of weights and measures; a pound is the
quantity of force that will accelerate one slug of matter at a rate of
one foot per second, per second.

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  #12  
Old 12-17-2004, 02:42 PM
Don. Shead a'course
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Default Force defined

Here's the way it works John:
In the SI system of weights and measures; a newton is the quantity of
force that will acelerate one kilogram of matter at a rate of one meter
per second, per second:

In the U.S. customary system of weights and measures; a pound is the
quantity of force that will accelerate one slug of matter at a rate of
one foot per second, per second.

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  #13  
Old 12-18-2004, 06:22 AM
lvlus@hotmail.com
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Default Force defined

Don, I guess you're right about that (post 8 this thread).
TomGee

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  #14  
Old 12-18-2004, 06:36 AM
lvlus@hotmail.com
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John, you say that force is measured in Newtons and energy in watts and
I agree, but that does not mean my definition is false. I did not say
anything about measuring force, and how we measure something is not a
definition of it. My whole point was that energy is measured in so
many ways that we should note that it ties together the four known
forces.

Here is another excerpt from my essay:
"I have heard no one seriously suggest that energy could be a fifth
force. That could be because all four forces use energy as their
motive power. They use it in different ways, but it is energy they
use, nevertheless. Even the so-called messenger, or "signal" particles
must accomplish their "work," or, "interactions," through the use of
energy. One would think that the concept of energy as a force could
easily be accepted on the basis alone that it is the one force which is
common to all the other forces and if so, it may be that it is also the
central factor of the GUT of the universe and essential to the TOE.
Clifford E. Swartz writes in "Mechanics," in an article for Microsoft
Encarta Encyclopedia 99: "The quantity called energy ties together all
branches of physics. In...mechanics, energy must be provided to do
work;.... Many other forms of energy exist: electric and magnetic
potential energy; kinetic energy; energy stored in compressed springs,
compressed gases, or molecular bonds; thermal energy; and mass itself."

My model of the universe proposes that energy is the major factor in
any Grand Unified Theory.
TomGee 121804

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  #15  
Old 12-18-2004, 07:04 AM
lvlus@hotmail.com
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Default Force defined

Don, I guess you're right about that.
TomGee

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  #16  
Old 12-18-2004, 04:33 PM
Jeremy Watts
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Default Force defined


"John Christiansen" <[Only registered users see links. ]> wrote in message
news:41c2b867$0$23080$[Only registered users see links. ].telia.net ...
in

john dont waste your time responding to shead - hes a well known troll and
spouter of rubbish, he also goes under several different names and responds
well to his own posts... hes likely to be Ivlus


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  #17  
Old 12-20-2004, 06:39 AM
lvlus@hotmail.com
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Default Force defined

I still don't see why you would want to divide energy by force, unless
you disagree that it is energy that is the force inherent in all the
other known forces. It is awkward to explain, but if we can see that
all the forces which we have identified so far are forces only because
of the energy we find in all of them, we can see then that energy is
the key to unifying the basic forces of the universe.

E.g., if energy can exist only in mass, but it seems to also exist in
massless particles, we must find a way to resolve the dilemma in a
general way. We have accepted that there exist a number of such
particles, but only as special cases explained through the process of
inductive logic. The photon, e.g., is said to be massless even though
it is well-known to contain some mass in it, in the general case.

The general case is a process of deductive logic, but it too has its
limitations wrt reality. Acting on the premise that energy can exist
only in mass, then, we must find how the mass in a photon is prevented
from increasing to infinity at c. I have already posted the answer to
that recently in these ngs, and it is that since we can only observe
the photon at c, the mass in it has already grown to the maximum size
it will ever grow (most people claim it would grow to infinite size).
If it is massless at rest, as physicists claim, it does not have to be
massless at motion. The very tiny amount of mass which we measure in a
moving photon is what it has grown to from the instant it acquired
motion. That is one way to solve the basic question which arises from
the implication that mass cannot possibly move at c. But that is only
one way; my model of the universe proposes yet another way out of this
dilemma if it is not possible for the scenario above to be an
acceptable explanation.

My model proposes that photon particles cannot move along with light
waves because they would have increase exponentially as the light wave
grows spherically, in order to fill in the gaps left as the wave
expands. The only possible way to fill in those gaps is to have the
particle remain essentially stationary as water molecules do when a
water wave disturbs them.
TomGee

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  #18  
Old 12-21-2004, 03:29 PM
tadchem
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Default Force defined


Don. Shead a'course wrote:

The more *I* expand, the less eenergy I seem to have :-P
Tom Davidson
Richmond, VA

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  #19  
Old 12-21-2004, 03:30 PM
tadchem
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Don. Shead a'course wrote:

The more *I* expand, the less energy I seem to have ;-P
Tom Davidson
Richmond, VA

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