Go Back   Science Forums Biology Forum Molecular Biology Forum Physics Chemistry Forum > General Science Forums > Physics Forum
Register Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Physics Forum Physics Forum. Discuss and ask physics questions, kinematics and other physics problems.


Amateur velocity/speed question

Amateur velocity/speed question - Physics Forum

Amateur velocity/speed question - Physics Forum. Discuss and ask physics questions, kinematics and other physics problems.


Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 04-13-2004, 08:11 PM
Mr Mint
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Amateur velocity/speed question



Good evening,
I wonder if anyone can either:

- give a direct answer to my question
- maybe point me in the right direction as to where I should be looking for
the math or answer to my question
- tell me to go away as this is a serious group

The question is:
If I have an object such as an iron ball 3 inches in diameter, wiehging 1
kilogram that is propelled upwards at the speed of light (or close), from a
stationary position with the force of gravity acting against it. How long
should it take to reach it's maximum velocity (close to light speed). I hope
this makes sense.

TIA

Mr Mint


Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 04-13-2004, 11:44 PM
N:dlzc D:aol T:com \(dlzc\)
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Amateur velocity/speed question

Dear Mr. Mint:

"Mr Mint" <[Only registered users see links. ]> wrote in message
news:407c47c3$0$29072$[Only registered users see links. ].news.easyne t.net...
for

Not as serious as some.


"with mass of 1 kilogram"


You would have to assume something about the source of the gravity.

hope

It starts out with its maximum velocity, and this decreases as it climbs
out of the "potential well".

David A. Smith


Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 04-14-2004, 02:08 PM
Mr Mint
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Amateur velocity/speed question

Thank you David, you have helped me to ask the question I was trying to form
originally.

Would you know a formula or where I should be looking to find out more
information about an accelerating objects' starting speed and its final
speed over a given distance.



"N:dlzc D:aol T:com (dlzc)" <N: dlzc1 D:cox T:[Only registered users see links. ]> wrote in
message news:b__ec.1947$Yf6.718@fed1read07...
1


Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 04-14-2004, 02:11 PM
N:dlzc D:aol T:com \(dlzc\)
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Amateur velocity/speed question

Dear Mr Mint:

"Mr Mint" <[Only registered users see links. ]> wrote in message
news:407d443c$0$6477$[Only registered users see links. ].news.easynet .net...
form

As long as you stay far away from c, you can always use Newton:
the relationship between velocity and acceleration
v=a * t + v0
the relationship between distance, velocity, and acceleration
s=1/2 * a * t^2 + v0 * t +s0

Since you have established that you are only interested in a differential
measurement, s0 can be zero.

If you want to work closer to c, you'll need to look at energies... a much
more complicated process. Especially when you consider that the moving
observer, and the stationary observer will not agree on the rate of speed.

David A. Smith


Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
amateur , question , velocity or speed


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
~~~ ASSOCIATION ~~~ lindallalbincochrane@gmail.com Forum Physik 1 02-18-2013 07:21 AM
question about phenol/water saturated solution Z.L. K Protocols and Methods Forum 2 02-11-2008 01:05 AM
Question about Hypothetical Type of Thermal Injury. Explained Radium Protein Forum 13 12-19-2005 09:32 PM
Sci.chem FAQ - Part 1 of 7 Bruce Hamilton Chemistry Forum 0 01-15-2004 09:06 AM


All times are GMT. The time now is 09:26 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2005 - 2012 Molecular Station | All Rights Reserved
Page generated in 0.14204 seconds with 16 queries