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Simple sphere volume Q

Simple sphere volume Q - Physics Forum

Simple sphere volume Q - Physics Forum. Discuss and ask physics questions, kinematics and other physics problems.


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  #1  
Old 12-27-2003, 08:25 PM
DaveC
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Default Simple sphere volume Q



If v = (4/3)*pi*r^3
what's the relationship of diameter to volume of a sphere?

Thanks,
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  #2  
Old 12-27-2003, 11:14 PM
Martin Hogbin
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Default Simple sphere volume Q


"DaveC" <[Only registered users see links. ]> wrote in message news:0001HW.BC132AD201894E1CF0407600@news.individu al.net...

d=2r take it from there

Martin Hogbin


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  #3  
Old 12-28-2003, 01:53 AM
Steven Gray
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Default Simple sphere volume Q

DaveC <[Only registered users see links. ]> wrote in
news:0001HW.BC132AD201894E1CF0407600@news.individu al.net:


v = (1/6)*pi*d^3

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Steve Gray
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  #4  
Old 12-28-2003, 05:19 AM
DaveC
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Default Simple sphere volume Q

On Sat, 27 Dec 2003 15:14:01 -0800, Martin Hogbin wrote
(in message <bsl3np$dfr$[Only registered users see links. ]>):


"And those who can't, write books." I write.

Take it from there.
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  #5  
Old 12-28-2003, 11:01 AM
Martin Hogbin
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Default Simple sphere volume Q


"DaveC" <[Only registered users see links. ]> wrote in message news:0001HW.BC13A7E8001836FFF0080600@news.individu al.net...

Steven has now given you the answer.

Martin Hogbin


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  #6  
Old 12-28-2003, 03:12 PM
DaveC
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Default Simple sphere volume Q

On Sun, 28 Dec 2003 3:01:18 -0800, Martin Hogbin wrote
(in message <bsmd5t$1ci$[Only registered users see links. ]>):


No, what Steven has given me is a clue. If I'm "mathematically challenged",
he might as well have given me a lump of charcoal. I'm sure he's
well-intentioned, but I'm not up to the challenge.

I'll ask elsewhere.

Thanks anyway,
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DaveC
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  #7  
Old 12-28-2003, 04:31 PM
N:dlzc D:aol T:com \(dlzc\)
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Default Simple sphere volume Q

Dear DaveC:

"DaveC" <[Only registered users see links. ]> wrote in message
news:0001HW.BC1432EF0023ECB5F0080600@news.individu al.net...
challenged",

What challenge? Look at the formula:
v = (1/6)*pi*d^3

There is only v for volume and d for diameter in it. Just exactly what you
asked for.
Were you looking to have it algebraically worked out too?

David A. Smith


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  #8  
Old 12-28-2003, 04:39 PM
DaveC
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Default Simple sphere volume Q

On Sun, 28 Dec 2003 8:31:13 -0800, N:dlzc D:aol T:com \(dlzc\) wrote
(in message <ozDHb.31692$gN.22341@fed1read05>):


Exactly what i was looking for (but didn't see...).

Thanks, Steven, and others.
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  #9  
Old 12-28-2003, 04:47 PM
james
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Default Simple sphere volume Q


"DaveC" <[Only registered users see links. ]> wrote in message
news:0001HW.BC1432EF0023ECB5F0080600@news.individu al.net...
challenged",


Steven's expression is relatively simple, but I can see why it might be
confusing to someone who isn't mathematically minded, expecially when it's
written in ASCII. I'll try and explain for you. Firstly, this is the
relationship: v = (1/6)*pi*d^3. v is the volume of the sphere, pi is a
Greek letter that is used to reprecesnt a particaulary special constant
(equal 3.141592654 to ten sig. fig.) and d is the diameter of the sphere.
The symbol ^ means "rasied to the power of", so d^3 is "d to the third
power" or "d cubed", and * means "multiplied by". So, what you have to do
is cube the diameter, and multiply it by some constant factors. When I say
cube the diameter, I mean multiply it by itself twice, so d*d*d = d^3, if
d=2, d^3=8.

If you need any more help, email me.

james


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  #10  
Old 12-29-2003, 07:17 PM
Fredie
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Default Simple sphere volume Q

Hello again James

No wonder physicists have a bad name. Some of you lot are such grumpy
*!>,.,?!** I think you sometimes forget that even "Simple" algebra is very
difficult for many people. To suddenly jump the way you lot did...

If I taught my AS/A2 lot that way half of them wouldn't have a chance - we
need to encourage not make it harder by being arrogant....

Sorry, but there you are!

james <[Only registered users see links. ].uk> wrote in message
news:bsn1fb$a1p$[Only registered users see links. ].ac.uk...
say


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