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Inducing electricity in a wire from a fluid.

Inducing electricity in a wire from a fluid. - Physics Forum

Inducing electricity in a wire from a fluid. - Physics Forum. Discuss and ask physics questions, kinematics and other physics problems.


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  #1  
Old 12-05-2003, 11:07 PM
Martin Pisz
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Default Inducing electricity in a wire from a fluid.





Hi
I'm not a physicist. I would like to know if, having a DC current flowing
through a fluid would be able to induce current in another wire or solenoid
near by.

Thanks
Martin

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  #2  
Old 12-06-2003, 01:53 AM
dlzc@aol.com \(formerly\)
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Default Inducing electricity in a wire from a fluid.

Dear Martin Pisz:

"Martin Pisz" <[Only registered users see links. ]> wrote in message
news:Nc8Ab.33507$[Only registered users see links. ]...
current flowing
solenoid

Yes. But either the "fluid current" needs to be alternating (or just
on-off), or the external "detector" needs to be moving. The fact that most
fluid containers allow for diffuse current may make it hard to detect...

David A. Smith


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  #3  
Old 12-06-2003, 04:07 AM
Martin Pisz
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Default Inducing electricity in a wire from a fluid.

formerly\ wrote:

What if the fluid is flowing, but the current is steady DC, is actually my
question? Will this distort the fluid flow in any way?

Thanks for any help
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  #4  
Old 12-06-2003, 04:29 AM
Paul R. Mays
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Default Inducing electricity in a wire from a fluid.


"Martin Pisz" <[Only registered users see links. ]> wrote in message
news:PBcAb.33980$[Only registered users see links. ]...

2 cents..

While I can give you a nice formula I think
I got what would occur understood...

You would create current but not through the
complete coil . As the fluid flows it will
create differing resistive local paths at a very
small scale and that local variance will cause
a variance in local currents. This would induce
small (very) voltages in a external conductor
due to the flux field forming and collapsing
but this would be in all micro areas of the fluid
and in all directions which would cause a
0 current in the whole of the outside conductor...

Paul


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  #5  
Old 12-06-2003, 04:48 AM
dlzc@aol.com \(formerly\)
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Default Inducing electricity in a wire from a fluid.

Dear Martin Pisz:

"Martin Pisz" <[Only registered users see links. ]> wrote in message
news:PBcAb.33980$[Only registered users see links. ]...

my

Macroscopic motion of the conductor, as Paul supplied, will not do much.

If the behaviour of welding cables is any indicator, any sudden change in
current will affect fluid flow, yes. But this has little to do with
external detection, and I suspect it will act to lessen the external
induction effect.

David A. Smith


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  #6  
Old 12-06-2003, 05:58 AM
Martin Pisz
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Default Inducing electricity in a wire from a fluid.

formerly\ wrote:

No way to make the flow induce a current then? Would pulsing the current in
the fluid work?


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  #7  
Old 12-06-2003, 06:21 AM
Paul R. Mays
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Default Inducing electricity in a wire from a fluid.


"Martin Pisz" <[Only registered users see links. ]> wrote in message
news:6eeAb.34159$[Only registered users see links. ]...
that
in
in

Yes.... You can use a fluid as a conductor and apply
a voltage to a tube filed with a conductive fluid and
wrap that tube around a conductor and apply a current
of electricity to the fluid.. You will get a voltage drop
across the conductor.... But it doesn't matter at that point
if the water is flowing or not as it is only acting as
a electrical conductor. There may be a very slight
variance if the fluid flow was turbulent which would
give a slightly variable resistive property.

You would also have to consider finding a way to
isolate the fluid from the charge source if you recalculates
the fluid with a pump because its conductive and the
current path from the conductor will follow the path of least
resistance... Through the pump not the test coil in question...

Paul


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  #8  
Old 12-06-2003, 03:38 PM
Martin Hogbin
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Default Inducing electricity in a wire from a fluid.


"Martin Pisz" <[Only registered users see links. ]> wrote in message news:Nc8Ab.33507$[Only registered users see links. ]...

To induce a current in a wire or solenoid
you need a changing magnetic field. A steady
current in a fixed circuit will produce a static
magnetic field, which will not produce an
induced current.

To get an induced current in the coil you
need the magnetic field through the coil
to change with time. With a DC current
you will either need to move the coil or to
arrange for the current path through the fluid
to vary with time, possibly by moving the
fluid itself. The ease with which you might
do this depends on the properties of
the fluid.

Martin Hogbin






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  #9  
Old 12-16-2003, 09:37 PM
Toni and Gord
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Default Inducing electricity in a wire from a fluid.


"Martin Pisz" <[Only registered users see links. ]> wrote in message
news:Nc8Ab.33507$[Only registered users see links. ]...
flowing
solenoid

Nope.


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  #10  
Old 12-16-2003, 11:37 PM
Gordon
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Default Inducing electricity in a wire from a fluid.

On Fri, 05 Dec 2003 16:07:19 -0700, Martin Pisz <[Only registered users see links. ]>
wrote:

If this fluid is in the form of a urine stream (saline solution)
from someone who is peeing on an electric fence, and if the fence
charger produces a pulsating dc output, then, yes, a wire
parallel to the urine stream would/could have an induced
pulsating dc current, assuming the parallel wire was connected to
something in such a way as to form a closed circuit path for the
induced current. And, yes, a solenoidal winding around that
person's phallus would also experience a pulsating dc.
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