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Krag 10-29-2003 07:18 AM

atom questions from newbie
 
Some questions from an extreme newbie

1) How does an electron in an atom gain/give, or lose energy so as to jump
up to the next shell or down to a lower one?


2) why are there 2, 8, and 18 electrons in these shells?


Given that the bond is strongest in the first shell, where does the energy
come from to 'dislodge' or kick the electron up to the next shell?


Please excuse my ignorance, but I would really appreciate some help



Paul R. Mays 10-29-2003 08:56 AM

atom questions from newbie
 

"Krag" <[Only registered and activated users can see links. Click Here To Register...].nz> wrote in message
news:bnnqnt$sdp$[Only registered and activated users can see links. Click Here To Register...].co.nz...
jump

Some would say that they don't... Some would say that electrons are EM
waves
that interact with the observer in the act of observing and the quantum
connection
of the observed and the observer and any device designed to observe biases
the
observation and gives the illusion of particulate nature... some would
say....


Paul R. Mays
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
-
Some where within the Quantum State
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"Science is what you know, philosophy is
what you don't know."
- by Alan Wood





Fredie 10-29-2003 07:47 PM

atom questions from newbie
 

Paul R. Mays <[Only registered and activated users can see links. Click Here To Register...]> wrote in message
news:[Only registered and activated users can see links. Click Here To Register...]...
energy


.....and I would say "What a helpful reply to a genuine question"


--



Paul R. Mays 10-29-2003 10:02 PM

atom questions from newbie
 

"Fredie" <[Only registered and activated users can see links. Click Here To Register...].uk> wrote in message
news:bnp5l8$ctt$[Only registered and activated users can see links. Click Here To Register...].pol.co.uk...
biases

Glad I could help... It was actually a point that the vision of
little balls of stuff whipping around a nucleus in a orbit like
the planets do, is not the reality of the structure. We have no idea
of the actually structure we only model it with a set of rules where
the most important rules are yet unknown ( causational aspects
of gravitational variance and magnetic causation ) We only have
rules that apply to effects aspects of matter in motion in relation to
other matter in motion which means that we don't know the nature
of the atomic structure only a model of what we mathematically
think it might be without knowing all the laws that rule its domain..





ghytrfvbnmju7654 10-29-2003 11:12 PM

atom questions from newbie
 
"Krag" <[Only registered and activated users can see links. Click Here To Register...].nz> wrote in message news:<bnnqnt$sdp$[Only registered and activated users can see links. Click Here To Register...].co.nz>...

It can get the energy from anything that can give it energy.
The most common sources for this energy would be photons
and being whacked by another atom.


A complete answer to this question requires solving the
Schrodinger equation. How comfortable are you with calculus
and with differential equations?

Krag 10-30-2003 06:16 AM

atom questions from newbie
 

ghytrfvbnmju7654 wrote in message ...
news:<bnnqnt$sdp$[Only registered and activated users can see links. Click Here To Register...].co.nz>...
jump

Thanks

Do you think I'd be asking these questions if I knew a thing about maths?
;-)










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