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Does scent travel according to the inverse law?

Does scent travel according to the inverse law? - Physics Forum

Does scent travel according to the inverse law? - Physics Forum. Discuss and ask physics questions, kinematics and other physics problems.


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  #1  
Old 09-24-2003, 02:34 PM
Donald G. Shead
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Default Does scent travel according to the inverse law?



Like scent travels "downwind": Is there any connection with the inverse law
of light radiation and gravitational intensity?


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  #2  
Old 09-24-2003, 02:51 PM
Rod
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Default Does scent travel according to the inverse law?

In terms of density of the scent, the law will be 1/r^2.
(assuming no wind and constant source)

This is because the volume of a thin spherical shell increases as r^2

However I believe a nose is very non-linear, so the perceived law would be
very different.


"Donald G. Shead" <[Only registered users see links. ]> wrote in message
news:dYhcb.1819$[Only registered users see links. ].prodigy.co m...
law


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  #3  
Old 09-24-2003, 02:58 PM
Donald G. Shead
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Default Does scent travel according to the inverse law?


"Rod" <[Only registered users see links. ]> wrote in message
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I agree Rod, but there's seldom a complete lack of "upwind" or "downwind".


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  #4  
Old 09-24-2003, 02:59 PM
Constantine
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Default Does scent travel according to the inverse law?


"Donald G. Shead" <[Only registered users see links. ]> wrote in message
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law

It's about diffusion.

Kostas.



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  #5  
Old 09-24-2003, 03:04 PM
Donald G. Shead
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Default Does scent travel according to the inverse law?


"Constantine" <[Only registered users see links. ].uk> wrote in message
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There ya go again: Too brief and to the point. Can't cha tell me a little
about how it diffuses?


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  #6  
Old 09-24-2003, 03:22 PM
Rod
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Default Does scent travel according to the inverse law?

If the wind is strong enough you will have a cone with the apex at the sent
source.
(with a well behaved wind!!!!)

for a mild wind I guess you have a sphere morphing into a cone.


"Donald G. Shead" <[Only registered users see links. ]> wrote in message
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be


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  #7  
Old 09-24-2003, 03:57 PM
Constantine
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Default Does scent travel according to the inverse law?


"Donald G. Shead" <[Only registered users see links. ]> wrote in message
news:0oicb.1823$[Only registered users see links. ].prodigy.com ...
inverse

OK, suppose that you leave a bottle with some perfume open in your house.
Sooner or later, you will smell it at the other end of the house, right?
What happens is that part of the perfume evaporates. That includes molecules
of alcohol and whatever else makes the perfume. If the bottle was closed,
this vapour would stay inside and right on top of the liquid perfume. But
the bottle is open, the molecules of the vapour are in a Brownian motion,
they mix with the molecules of the air (which are also in a state of
Brownian motion!) and eventually are carried away from the bottle. That's
what diffusion means. Now, the density of the perfume's vapour decreases the
further you are from the bottle. Yet, even a few molecules, are sufficient
to interact with your nose and thus you can detect it (i.e., smell it!).

It is the same phenomenon with diffusion of ink in water. Take a big jar of
water (transparent, so you can see what goes on inside) and drop a small
amount of ink. Then you will see how the ink diffuses in the water.

Unfortunately, I don't have handy a book of physics around me, so that I can
give you further references and/or a mathematical description.

Kostas.



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  #8  
Old 09-25-2003, 12:42 AM
Chris
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Default Does scent travel according to the inverse law?

No its patchy like clouds
"Donald G. Shead" <[Only registered users see links. ]> wrote in message
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law


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