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can free quarks exist?

can free quarks exist? - Physics Forum

can free quarks exist? - Physics Forum. Discuss and ask physics questions, kinematics and other physics problems.


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  #11  
Old 08-26-2003, 04:29 PM
Gordon D. Pusch
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Default can free quarks exist?

[Only registered users see links. ] (Russell Wallace) writes:


No. When ``strange quark matter'' is hot enough, it can ``envaporate''
protons and neutrons by a process analogous to thermionic emission.
While the ``strange quark nugget'' (or ``strangelet'' for short)
is still large enough, it can maintain weak interaction equilibrium
between the `u', `d', and `s' quarks (and therefore near-equality
of fermi levels), which keeps it stable, but eventually it will become
small enough that a lump of ``ordinary'' nuclear matter will be the
more stable state. (How small it can become before this happens
is still a matter of debate, as it depends on QCD effects that
cannot yet be precisely calculated.)


-- Gordon D. Pusch

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  #12  
Old 08-27-2003, 03:46 AM
Y.Porat
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Default can free quarks exist?

[Only registered users see links. ] (Gordon D. Pusch) wrote in message news:<[Only registered users see links. ].com>...
----------------
if it cannot be calculated than
why and what are you mumbling nonsense about?
all the best
Y.porat
--------------------------
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  #13  
Old 08-27-2003, 04:14 PM
Russell Wallace
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Default can free quarks exist?

On 26 Aug 2003 11:29:47 -0500, [Only registered users see links. ] (Gordon D.
Pusch) wrote:


So a chunk of the stuff would need to be both large and cold to be
stable? What sort of temperature would be needed? (Why doesn't it also
evaporate lambda particles?)


I'm still not understanding the "near-equality of Fermi levels" bit I
think - I was under the impression strange quark matter was stable for
the same reason neutronium is, i.e. it's a configuration that allows
the particles to be packed more tightly under external pressure. Is
there a layman-accessible explanation of what holds it together in the
absence of external pressure?

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