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One kg = 9.81 N/(9.81 m/secē)

One kg = 9.81 N/(9.81 m/secē) - Physics Forum

One kg = 9.81 N/(9.81 m/secē) - Physics Forum. Discuss and ask physics questions, kinematics and other physics problems.


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  #1  
Old 08-09-2003, 11:12 AM
gandg@snet.net
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Default One kg = 9.81 N/(9.81 m/secē)




Yes one kilogram is 9.806 65 N per [9.806 65/secē]


How much more accurate does it have to be?


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  #2  
Old 08-14-2003, 11:47 AM
Donald G. Shead
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Default One kg = w/g = 9.81 N/(9.81 m/secē)


Mathematically: One kilogram is 9.806 65 N per [9.806 65/secē]: That is the
ratio [w/g] of its weight [w], to the acceleration of free fall [g] at
Sevres' France is _ONE_!

So: That one kilogram is one _unit_ of mass and/or inertia; f/a = 1 N
secē/m!


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  #3  
Old 08-14-2003, 03:34 PM
Donald G. Shead
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Default One kg = w/g = 9.81 N/(9.81 m/secē)


"a@b.c" <[Only registered users see links. ]> wrote in message
news:eAM_a.724015$[Only registered users see links. ]. ca...
If I can get it right; consistently, maybe somebody with some "smarts" and
some "moola" to invest, will help; so we can become rich and famous!

I think that's a pretty good point Nick.


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  #4  
Old 08-14-2003, 04:00 PM
The Ghost In The Machine
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Default One kg = w/g = 9.81 N/(9.81 m/secē)

In sci.physics, Donald G. Shead
<[Only registered users see links. ]>
wrote
on Thu, 14 Aug 2003 11:47:10 GMT
<2FK_a.24769$[Only registered users see links. ].prodigy.c om>:

So what? g varies by about 0.4 % across the Earth but mass,
absent movement, is constant.

Now take that mass to Boulder, Colorado. Do the pan scales
still show level?

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  #5  
Old 08-14-2003, 06:23 PM
Donald G. Shead
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Default One kg = w/g = 9.81 N/(9.81 m/secē)


"The Ghost In The Machine" <[Only registered users see links. ]> wrote in
message news:[Only registered users see links. ]...
Sure, and they'll be level on the moon too because the variable weight of
any object, body or mass of matter when divided by the rate of freefall
wherever they are is a constant - called its inertia - which is a measure
of its gravitational mass.

Inertia can be _felt_, but not accurately measured, by hefting:
Weight-scales are made for measuring weight which varies with the location:
Balance scales are made for comparing weight and will not "show level" if
the weights aren't equal.

Again: Weight varies in proportion to the acceleration of freefall; so that
w/g is a constant! This constant ratio is equal to the ratio of the net
force exerted on, and/or by an object, body or mass of matter, to the
acceleration that occurs; anytime, anyplace.


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  #6  
Old 08-15-2003, 12:02 PM
Donald G. Shead
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Default One kg = w/g = 9.81 N/(9.81 m/secē)


"Sam Wormley" <[Only registered users see links. ]> wrote in message
news:[Only registered users see links. ]...
N?

Yes, and Newton's acceleration has units of feet/secē: So that f/a = w/g;
where g @ Earth's surface is about 32'/secē.


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  #7  
Old 08-15-2003, 01:14 PM
The Ghost In The Machine
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Default One kg = w/g = 9.81 N/(9.81 m/secē)

In sci.physics, Donald G. Shead
<[Only registered users see links. ]>
wrote
on Thu, 14 Aug 2003 18:23:57 GMT
<1tQ_a.24973$[Only registered users see links. ].prodigy.c om>:

Good, there's hope for you yet. :-) I should note however, that
a pan scale works on the principles of torque. Since the lever
arms are usually equal this usually isn't an issue but I
could see some slightly unusual asymmetrical variants.


So call it m already. That's what most people do, assuming
they don't simply state "Gee, this stuff looks like a constant
amount of matter; let's call this concept 'mass'", and
work from there.


That's more or less correct, although you're looking at
the problem backwards.

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  #8  
Old 08-15-2003, 01:52 PM
Gene Nygaard
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Default One kg = w/g = 9.81 N/(9.81 m/secē)

On Fri, 15 Aug 2003 12:02:52 GMT, "Donald G. Shead" <[Only registered users see links. ]>
wrote:


Newton sometimes used toises, pieds, etc. in his own work.

Gene Nygaard
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  #9  
Old 08-15-2003, 01:55 PM
Gene Nygaard
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Default One kg = w/g = 9.81 N/(9.81 m/secē)

On Thu, 14 Aug 2003 15:34:34 GMT, "Donald G. Shead" <[Only registered users see links. ]>
wrote:


ROFLMAO!

But *IF* you are going to get it right, you are going to have to start
listening to someone other than that idiot u10889.

Gene Nygaard
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