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using sieves

using sieves - Organic Chemistry Forum

using sieves - Organic Chemistry Forum


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  #1  
Old 01-15-2007, 11:20 AM
chemrox
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Default using sieves



I'm running a reaction where the recommended procedure for getting rid
of water is stirring in molecular sieves. The size was specified for
an anlagous reaction. My question is: what if any pretreatment of the
sieves is needed?


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Old 07-09-2011, 01:30 PM
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Default Re: using sieves

Regeneration in typical cyclic systems constitutes removal of the adsorbate from the molecular sieve bed by heating and purging with a carrier gas. Sufficient heat must be applied to raise the temperature of the adsorbate, the adsorbent and the vessel to vaporize the liquid and offset the heat of wetting the molecular-sieve surface. The bed temperature is critical in regeneration. Bed temperatures in the 175-260 range are usually employed for type 3A. This lower range minimizes polymerization of olefins on the molecular sieve surfaces when such materials are present in the gas. Slow heat up is recommended since most olefinic materials will be removed at minimum temperatures; 4A, 5A and 13X sieves require temperatures in the 200-315 C range.

After regeneration, a cooling period is necessary to reduce the molecular sieve temperature to within 15 of the temperature of the stream to be processed. This is most conveniently done by using the same gas stream as for heating, but with no heat input. For optimum regeneration, gas flow should be countercurrent to adsorption during the heat up cycle, and concurrent (relative to the process stream) during cooling. Alternatively, small quantities of molecular sieves may be dried in the absence of a purge gas by oven heating followed by slow cooling in a closed system, such as a desiccator.

Some common molecules and their critical diameters.

Molecule Critical
diam. () Molecule Critical diam.()
Helium

2.0

Propylene

5.0

Hydrogen

2.4

Ethyl mercaptan

5.1

Acetylene

2.4

1-Butene

5.1

Oxygen

2.8

trans-2-Butene

5.1

Carbon monoxide

2.8

1,3-Butadiene

5.2

Carbon dioxide

2.8

Chlorodi fluoromethane

5.3

Nitrogen

3.0

Thiophene

5.3

Water

3.2

Isobutane to isodocosane

5.6

Ammonia

3.6

Cyclohexane

6.1

Hydrogen sulfide

3.6

Benzene

6.7

Argon

3.8

Toluene

6.7

Methane

4.0

p-Xylene

6.7

Ethylene

4.2

Carbon tetrachloride

6.9

Ethylene oxide

4.2

Chloroform

6.9

Ethane

4.4

Neopentane

6.9

Methanol

4.4

m-Xylene

7.1

Methyl mercaptan

4.5

o-Xylene

7.4

Propane

4.9

Triethylamine

8.4

n-Butane to n-docosane

4.9
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  #3  
Old 02-12-2013, 03:21 PM
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