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CD19 09-07-2012 01:15 PM

Plasma cells in circulating blood.
 
I am looking for an article which gives the per cent of plasma cells in circulating blood. I wrote down one day that it is maximal 2% in healthy person, but today I can't find where I got it from and almost all publications I found say that they aren't detectable, but it ain't true coz plasma cells are transported by plasma blood so of course they are there. I need a proof of it in article.

Zagami 09-10-2012 02:58 PM

Re: Plasma cells in circulating blood.
 
Plasma cells are rarely found in the peripheral blood and then not normally present in it. In bone marrow plasma cells, called "long-life plasma cells", can be found from 0.2-2.8 %. They is located in the peripheral lympho nodes and normally they are not circulating in peripheral blood, while they are in blood only when pathological conditions be present (e.g. multiple myeloma, etc.)

CD19 10-02-2012 04:07 PM

Re: Plasma cells in circulating blood.
 
Could you then try to answer my another question? I copied it from new thread.

"I culture PBMCs (peripheral blood mononuclear cells) and I wonder if I have memory B cells in the culture. I know that there is almost no plasmacytes coz their per cent in full blood is very low. What about memory B cells?

If answer is "yes, there are memory B cells in your culture" then here goes another question. If I stimulate Th cells in culture only with anti-CD3 and thanks to their stimulation B cells are also stimulated so is it possible that memory B cells will response? Is anti-CD3 stimulation a secondary response for memory B cells? Anti-CD3 binds TCR on Th so is this sth new for them or normal situation coz they always catch sth through TCR? I think it is sth new coz they won't find sth so ideally similat to anti-CD3 in nature so even if I have memory B cells in culture they won't react on that."

Quote:

Originally Posted by Zagami (Post 442052)
Plasma cells are rarely found in the peripheral blood and then not normally present in it. In bone marrow plasma cells, called "long-life plasma cells", can be found from 0.2-2.8 %. They is located in the peripheral lympho nodes and normally they are not circulating in peripheral blood, while they are in blood only when pathological conditions be present (e.g. multiple myeloma, etc.)


Zagami 10-04-2012 06:49 AM

Re: Plasma cells in circulating blood.
 
As foreword, B cell, such as other immune cells, in body are present in two development steps : a) resting/naive and primed/memory. The first (small lymphocytes) is located in spleen, and those circulating are trapped in lymph nodes, while primed/memory B cell are located in whole body, blood included. When you cultivate PBMC's in stimulating medium (PHA, PWM/ConA and others) are activated primed/memory B cell, that in few days are modified in plasma blast and then in plasma cell with Ig production/secretion. In Aristotle philosophy egg (B cell) to be a potential chicken (plasma cell).
Question : I culture PBMCs (peripheral blood mononuclear cells) and I wonder if I have memory B cells in the culture. I know that there is almost no plasmacytes coz their per cent in full blood is very low. What about memory B cells ?
Answer : Yes, B memory cell is present in peripheral blood that, only following to stimulation they will become plasma cell.
Question : If I stimulate Th cells in culture only with anti-CD3 and thanks to their stimulation B cells are also stimulated so is it possible that memory B cells will response?
Answer : Yes, anti-CD3 reacts with receptor present on the surface of the T cell that induces production of different cytokines among which IL-2 play a fundamental role for activation of B cell
Question : Is anti-CD3 stimulation a secondary response for memory B cells?
Answer : With reference to the stimulation, the B cell response is surely secondary
Question : Anti-CD3 binds TCR on Th so is this sth new for them or normal situation coz they always catch sth through TCR?
Answer : Anti-CD3 bound CD3 receptor that is part of the TCR core that activates a series of kinase conducting to the activation of nuclear factor that brings to the synthesis of different cytokines and relative receptors. They can act in an autocrine manner, affecting the behavior of the cell that releases the cytokine, or in a paracrine manner, affecting the behavior of adjacent cells.
Question : I think it is sth new coz they won't find sth so ideally similat to anti-CD3 in nature so even if I have memory B cells in culture they won't react on that.
Answer : Ideally, absence of one specific stimulating for TCR doesn't allow the secretion of inductors on the B cell and therefore their stimulation. Nevertheless we are speaking of "in vitro" cultivation in which different exogenous factors (contact with the glass, quality/quantity of elements in medium, pH, growth factors [e.g.: FCS or AB human serum, transferrin, etc. ], etc.) can to determine direct or indirect spurious activation that it generally constitutes the background of the assay.
I hope to have been exhaustive
Postscript : I like your nick name, are in love with B cell ? At soon

CD19 10-06-2012 11:08 AM

Re: Plasma cells in circulating blood.
 
Why this signal coming from Th cells stimulated with anti-CD3 is secondary for memory cells? Just coz of cytokines production?
I checked that I have IgM production, but I can't find any IgG. If this stimulation would give secondary response then I would have IgG, but I don't have. The reason of this can be too short time of culture, coz I lead it for 5 days. Maybe. I am thinking now to extend one culture for at least 7 days and check again if I have IgGs there.

My PhD thesis is about B cells. This what I am asking about is a part of my thesis. I like immunology, but since B cells are my major aim I foster them ;)

CD19 10-06-2012 11:30 AM

Re: Plasma cells in circulating blood.
 
I read many times that memory cells can react only in situation when they bind antigen they met before and this causes strong secondary reaction and in my culture the only signal comes from Th cells coz only they are activated directly (there is no antigen that could be bound by B cell).

Zagami 10-07-2012 06:17 AM

Re: Plasma cells in circulating blood.
 
For last but one post please see you
[Only registered and activated users can see links. Click Here To Register...]
and
[Only registered and activated users can see links. Click Here To Register...]

Zagami 10-08-2012 07:19 AM

Re: Plasma cells in circulating blood.
 
Dear CD19
Ask if you possess the volume "Methods in Molecular Biology - Vol. 271 - B cell Protocols - Year 2004 in .pdf format. If you could to send at my address "[Only registered and activated users can see links. Click Here To Register...]"
Thanks in advance

CD19 10-19-2012 08:08 PM

Re: Plasma cells in circulating blood.
 
If I had it I wouldn't ask here. I think that the problem is more complicated here. I have checked recently that some B cells lose IL-10R, IL-4R and IL-5R during culture and signals coming from those receptors are crucial for antibody class switching. That's why (maybe) I can't find IgG.

Zagami 10-26-2012 01:53 PM

Re: Plasma cells in circulating blood.
 
The terminal differentiation of activated B cells is the formation of immunoglobulin-secreting cells (plasma cell). For provides at functional diversity of the humoral immune response, in B cell an system called "class switch recombination (CSR)" is mechanism to promote the isotypic switch in different immunoglobulin class, which molecular mechanisms it’s not completely known. Involvement of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (Aid), a potential RNA editing enzyme, has been shown in the regulation or catalysis of the DNA modification step of CSR. The switch of the immunoglobulin isotype from IgM to IgG, IgE or IgA, is highly regulated by cytokines such as transforming growth factor (TGF)-β, IL-4 and interferon-γ (IFN-γ), B cell activators such as CD40 ligand and lipopolysaccaride (LPS), or both. IL-4 is a prominent cytokine for CSR to IgG1 and IgE in B cells stimulated with CD40 or with LPS. Like IL-4, IL-5 is able to elicit the maturation of CD40-activated B cells to IgM- and IgG1-secreting cells and induce to γ1 CSR and IgG1 production in LPS-activated B cells.


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