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Difference b/t Molecular Biology, Microbiology, Biotechnology

Difference b/t Molecular Biology, Microbiology, Biotechnology - General Science Questions and Layperson Board

Difference b/t Molecular Biology, Microbiology, Biotechnology - General Science Questions and Layperson Board


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  #21  
Old 07-23-2010, 04:24 PM
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Cool Re: Difference b/t Molecular Biology, Microbiology, Biotechnology

You keep conveniently missing the point.
You keep conveniently framing things like a BS in Micro, gets you stuck w/ only a BS in Micro, which is the opposite of everything I've said.
You keep conveniently merging Cell bio with Mol Bio, like they are the same thing, 30 years ago maybe but not today.
You keep conveniently saying a Micro BS won't get you a research job, when that wasn't the point, the point was entry to a grad or professional program; and a better scientist/thinker once both undergrad and grad degrees are done (anecdotal experience).

So to make it simple:
The point all along has been that the grad and professional programs are accepting people who play the game correctly, that means candidates that show a track record of skills mastered during the degree progams they are enrolled in.

Enrolling into a program and mastering the curriculum is what it is all about.
Go to a medical school and the student body (with diverse Bachelor's degrees) have exactly that in common, both in academic transcripts and obvious personal/interpersonal skills.

Anyway if you have managed to understand thus far, which I doubt:

The advantage of the Microbio BS is that that degree program is well suited to that kind of mastery. The emphasis (a lot of Unis don't emphasize undergrad education, btw) is very strong on the undergrad Micro students.

This has gotten old, you can have the last word if you want it.
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  #22  
Old 07-23-2010, 05:53 PM
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Default Re: Difference b/t Molecular Biology, Microbiology, Biotechnology

Quote:
Originally Posted by danfive View Post
You keep conveniently missing the point.
You keep conveniently framing things like a BS in Micro, gets you stuck w/ only a BS in Micro, which is the opposite of everything I've said.
I not once said that.

Quote:
Originally Posted by danfive View Post
You keep conveniently merging Cell bio with Mol Bio, like they are the same thing, 30 years ago maybe but not today.
On this we disagree - the two fields are indivisibly linked. You can not do one without the other...

Quote:
Originally Posted by danfive View Post
You keep conveniently saying a Micro BS won't get you a research job,
I never once said that - and I challenge you to prove otherwise.

What I clearly said was simple:

You need a graduate degree or MD to get into research. A bachelors, regardless of the field, will not get you into research.

I also challenged you to prove me wrong on this point - you didn't, and restating your position hardly qualifies as evidence.

Quote:
Originally Posted by danfive View Post
The advantage of the Microbio BS is that that degree program is well suited to that kind of mastery. The emphasis (a lot of Unis don't emphasize undergrad education, btw) is very strong on the undergrad Micro students.
And, as I said before, this is not an accurate representation of reality. I would never take on a person with a B.Sc in micro, not because I'm biased against micro, but rather because their knowledge of cell/molecular biology would be insufficient to start a graduate degree in our program. That is not even my policy, but rather is departmental policy. Incoming grand students must have a B.Sc. in an appropriate field.

So your claim that a micro degree will give you superior training to get into grad school is pure BS (not in the degree sense) - it'll give you superior training to get into some graduate programs, while eliminating you as a candidate for others.

Hence my advice - find a specialization you love, and stick with it. If you're good you'll get into grad school in a relevant program. Pretending that one B.Sc is better and will magically make you a better candidate is wishful thinking at best.

As for med school, you first need to pass your MCAT to get in - and a general biology degree will equip you better for that than will any specialization (unless you're uni has a pre-med program, that is).

Bryan
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