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Bioremediation

Bioremediation - Environmental Sciences and Issues

Bioremediation - Forum on Environmental Sciences and Issues, including bioremediation and biodegradation.


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  #1  
Old 03-07-2007, 05:55 PM
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Default Bioremediation



Hi
with the rapid increase in human population and industrilization, our environment is becoming more and more pollutants, there are many ways to clean the environment but the better and economical way is bioremediation, as this is a natural process to clean the environment and now it is used by genetically modifying the organism and also in a more managed way to remove the pollutants from the environment.

regards
aftab
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  #2  
Old 03-30-2007, 04:52 PM
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Default Re: Bioremediation

You are right,but bioremediation is not a very efficient way to clean the envirnment,because the way of bioremediation is very long way!!
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Old 11-28-2008, 03:13 PM
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Default Recycling Problem

Recycling involves processing used materials into new products in order to prevent waste of potentially useful materials, reduce the consumption of fresh raw materials, reduce energy usage, reduce air pollution (from incineration) and water pollution (from landfilling) by reducing the need for "conventional" waste disposal, and lower greenhouse gas emissions as compared to virgin production.Recycling is a key component of modern waste management and is the third component of the "Reduce, Reuse, Recycle" waste hierarchy.
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Old 01-28-2009, 10:30 AM
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Default Re: Bioremediation

Two central and incorrect assumptions.
First - we are not building up pollutants or pollution. These have decreased substantially over the last 4 decades.
Second - genetically modified bugs have proved not useful beyond specific focused and supported operations. They don't survive or proliferate in the environment where the native flora holds sway.
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Old 02-04-2009, 04:42 AM
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Default Re: Bioremediation

Is this a bot-thread?
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Old 02-04-2009, 11:26 AM
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Default Re: Bioremediation

are you a fool?
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Old 02-05-2009, 06:25 AM
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Default Re: Bioremediation

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jorge1907 View Post
are you a fool?
Jorge, has no-one told you it's important to play nice??

I thought it was a fair question, because I've seen too many generated postings. Seeing as how your response seems too rude for anything but a person...

In response to dutilapia, the speed of bioremediation might be slow, but if it's more effective in doing the job, time is not always the overriding concern.

As for jorge's comment about pollutants decreasing over time, I think you need to look at the figures again. China alone has been polluting itself in increasing amounts each year. I believe that 3 of the 10 most-polluted towns on the planet are Chinese (please correct me if the figure is wrong). Add to that the rest of the planet, and I don't think anyone can imagine the world is getting less-polluted...

The issue of overcoming the local flora is something that will be of highly variable importance. Where there has been a large pollution spill, such as an oil tanker leakage (think Exxon Valdez), bioremediation might be the only effective method. The bioremediation testing done with the Valdez suggested it would be the only way to remove the oil, rather than just take it out of sight (as was the case with the traditional methods of cleanup). Slow it might be, but if it gets rid of the oil it has done its job.

For those who didn't hear the details, the traditional method (using high-pressure hot water) caused the oil to leach down into the subsoil. Bioremediation broke down the oil to a depth of ~2m.
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Old 02-11-2009, 10:24 AM
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Default Re: Bioremediation

Hi,
Wow, I just love this kind of stuff. This is the first time, I, visited this website and really like this one. Please keep updating me one this.
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Old 02-16-2009, 02:45 PM
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Default Re: Bioremediation

welcome csk!

swanny - sorry for your hurt feelings but I really suggest you address the points and drop the whining ad hominem.

No - you obviously are only superficially aware of the term "bioremediation." You say it's more effective, offering no comparison - so mjore than what?

In fact, it is a process that takes place largrely on its own time scale and rate. Where it has been applied, it's an excellent tool - in very narrow and controlled applications. The Exxon Valdez was in fact the critical experiment of how it doesn't work. DESPITE all the engineered strains used - the ONLY effective treatment was fertilization of the resident bacteria and that consumed only the straight chain hydrocarbons and less condensed aromatics. The heavily condensed aromoatics esp. asphaltenes. were present for decades. Their eventual disappearance was more to physical dispersion and erosion.


And no - pollutants have decreased. Tho as you said, China and India have indeed increased, the former Soviet Union and its satellite states have dramatically decreased their emissions of all types - as has the entire Western world and dramatically so since thropugh the latter part of the last century.

Last edited by Jorge1907; 02-16-2009 at 02:47 PM.
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Old 06-12-2009, 07:42 AM
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Default Re: Bioremediation

Cleaning up munitions dumps is yet another target of transgenic plants, with some interesting biological participants. In one approach, a bacterial gene that breaks down trinitrotoluene (TNT, the major component of dynamite and land mines) is linked to a jellyfish gene that makes the protein glow green. The bacteria can be spread directly on soil that is thought to contain weapons residues, or the genes can be transferred to various types of plants, whose roots then glow when they are near buried explosives. In the future, plants that have been genetically modified in several ways will be able to detect a variety of pollutants or toxins.
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