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organic chemistry books published in India

organic chemistry books published in India - Chemistry Forum

organic chemistry books published in India - Chemistry Forum. Discuss chemical reactions, chemistry.


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  #1  
Old 01-14-2004, 07:59 PM
Allan Adler
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Default organic chemistry books published in India




Mohammed Farooq, who kindly provided a list of chemistry books published
in India, asks:


I was not able to locate them in libraries available to me.
I haven't tried interlibrary loan yet. When placing an interlibrary
loan order, it helps to have as much information as possible, including
the publisher and the city where the book was published and the year
of publication.

I don't know what it would cost to purchase any of these books and to
have them shipped from India to the US. That would also require one
to know the coordinates of the publishers and convenient ways to
contact them.

I really don't want to put MF to a lot of trouble. It is certainly
possible to place an interlibrary loan order for a book without knowing
all the information.

I'm not good at searching the library of congress online. Perhaps that would
be a way to find out all that I need to know without troubling anyone.

Ignorantly,
Allan Adler
[Only registered users see links. ]

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  #2  
Old 01-16-2004, 02:56 AM
amanda
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Default organic chemistry books published in India

Allan Adler <[Only registered users see links. ].mit.edu> wrote in message news:<[Only registered users see links. ].mit.edu>...

I think shipping fees will cost 10 times the book's cost.
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  #3  
Old 01-19-2004, 11:43 PM
amanda
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Default organic chemistry books published in India

Are you still interested in finding out the contact info in India to
purchase Chemistry books?

If you are interested in posting such a question at a bulletin borad
of Indian Student Association at a University I went to, email me at
[Only registered users see links. ] for the link to post that question. If possible,
let me know HERE that you have sent an email there.

I have asked and was told that anyone can post such a question; you do
not have to be a member.
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  #4  
Old 02-07-2004, 09:08 AM
Mohammed Farooq
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Default organic chemistry books published in India

Allan Adler <[Only registered users see links. ].mit.edu> wrote in message news:<[Only registered users see links. ].mit.edu>...
Allan Alder wrote
published
engineering
the book
on

the

Good to know that Allan Adler finally got hold an Indian Organic
Chemistry text, that would atleast give him an idea of the approach
in teaching chemistry in developing countries. I am sure almost all
such book would have
the same approach. Few thing to be noticed in those books would be:

How little logical questions are asked at the end of chapters, mostly
"mark and copy approach" questions are aksed such as prepare
nitrobenzene from benzene? Define homologous series and so on.
Comparing it with a common American text such as Morrison and Boyd,
they first present the problem and ask you to think and propose a
"possible" route to synthesis, ie you can not find the answer by
simply reading and marking, okay the answer starts from third
paragrapgh and ends on fifth line. There is no deductive or inductive
logic in such typical questions.

Allan Alder also noticed that at the end the of chapter, exams
question are given with the date and the name of the exam in which it
was asked.This is common in almost all Indian books, whether they are
keys or textbooks. Kent Breathe ( name?), is right, that they are
following the "old" British pattern. Pick any British text published
before 1950's and see how each end of the chapter question is labelled
in brackets as (Univ. of London 1948), (Cambridge Univ. 1930) and so
on.

Another aspect is that many modern American chemistry undergraduate
texts are slightly verbose or rather one feels as if they are talking
to the reader, the British texts are concise, and talk to the point
perhaps this is what the Indian writers adopted as their writing style
(personal opinions may vary). A major problem is that English is not
their mother tongue hence they can not express themselves more
"beautifully". I don't feel in most cases a native English speaker can
express himself eloquently in anohter language-they don't need to- in
modern times, because English has become the language of science. We
know if we don't learn English we will further lag behind in every
field. The BBC English program said that what an Englishman would say
in 20 words a non native speaker would say in 5 words, perhaps this is
the reason for the commom textbooks crossing thousand
pages.
India was atleast more productive than its neighbouring countries (has
China produced Nobel prize winner?) as far as I remember it has
"produced" four or five Nobel prize winners- C.V. Raman,
Chandersheker, to name a few of "the few". Very few people know that
Arthur Holly Compton worked in Punjab University-Pakistan during the
British era for one or two years. Abdus Salam (Salam-Wienberg ) of
Pakistani origin worked in particle research center -Geneva. Edgar
Allan Poe(spelling) was Indian born.
I would have been happier if Allan Adler found laboratory text of
Indian origin then we would have compared the difference.I don't know
for how long Allan Adler was out of touch from chemistry?
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