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increasing the conductivity of a liquid

increasing the conductivity of a liquid - Chemistry Forum

increasing the conductivity of a liquid - Chemistry Forum. Discuss chemical reactions, chemistry.


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  #1  
Old 11-05-2003, 09:16 PM
Ron Amundson
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Default increasing the conductivity of a liquid



I need to create an electrically conductive liquid that will not
solidify nor boil over a temperature range of -40 deg C to 105 deg C.

I started out with propylene glycol to achieve the temperature range,
and than have tried various materials to make an electrically
conductive solution. I first tried powdered metals, however even when
turning the material into a paste, the conductivity was still around
200kohms/inch. I know the units should be something else, but its been
20+ years since college chem, and its been unsed since then.

Realisitically, it would seem that the solution needs to have a mix of
water and some conductive salts in order to lower the conductivity to
the 1 ohm/inch requirement that I need. Are their any resources that
you guys can point me at to get started.

Thanks
ROn
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  #2  
Old 11-05-2003, 10:02 PM
Barry Hunt
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Default increasing the conductivity of a liquid


"Ron Amundson" <[Only registered users see links. ]> wrote in message
news:1d749cf8.0311051316.63ab885f@posting.google.c om...

I think you mean lower the resisitance/increase the conductivity


If you add, say, 1% water to the PG then saturate with salt (eg. NaCl) will
that give you enough conductivity?

There are also "ionic liquids" which are non-volatile organic salts which
may satisfy your requirements.

HTH

Barry Hunt


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  #3  
Old 11-06-2003, 09:56 PM
David Naugler
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Default increasing the conductivity of a liquid

[Only registered users see links. ] (Ron Amundson) wrote


Why not try say, 20% hydrochloric acid?
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  #4  
Old 11-06-2003, 11:04 PM
Steve Turner
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Default increasing the conductivity of a liquid

[Only registered users see links. ] (David Naugler) wrote:


If there is going to be any significant current through the solution,
it would be better to use sulfuric or phosphoric acid, in order to
prevent anodic oxidation of chloride and formation of Cl2, HOCl, etc.

Steve Turner

Real address contains worldnet instead of spamnet
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