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De-ionizing water

De-ionizing water - Chemistry Forum

De-ionizing water - Chemistry Forum. Discuss chemical reactions, chemistry.


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  #1  
Old 08-10-2003, 04:15 AM
Charlie Johnson
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Default De-ionizing water



Hi all,

Does anybody know of a simple way to de-ionized water? What I mean by
simple is, can be done at home.

TIA,
Lurch


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  #2  
Old 08-10-2003, 08:22 PM
fkasner
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Default De-ionizing water



Charlie Johnson wrote:

At such a small volume it would make the most sense to buy gallon
bottles of distilled (better than deionized usually) water at the
supermarket. Lots cheaper than buying a deionizing column to attach to
the water faucet.
FK

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  #3  
Old 08-11-2003, 04:13 AM
Charlie Johnson
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Default De-ionizing water

Thanks everyone!

If the experiment calls for de-ionized water, then do you think that I can
just substitute distilled? Really, these are just freshman college
chemistry experiments.

TIA,
Charlie


"Charlie Johnson" <[Only registered users see links. ]> wrote in message
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way
was


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  #4  
Old 08-11-2003, 05:48 AM
Henry Boyter
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Default De-ionizing water

What is the experiment? You may need to think about
the appropriateness of doing them at home.
Many are intended to be done in a lab only.
They may require a proper hood !! For most freshman labs,
distilled water is good enough.


--

Henry Boyter, Jr.
PhD Chemist

[Only registered users see links. ]
The opinions expressed are those of Dr. Boyter and
are provided for informational purposes only and
should not be used as advice. No warranty or
expression of professionalism is implied.


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of


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  #5  
Old 08-11-2003, 07:39 AM
dave.lister@web.de
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Default De-ionizing water

"Henry Boyter" <[Only registered users see links. ]> wrote in message news:<RxxZa.18452$[Only registered users see links. ]. com>...

Where the "distilled water" in the grocery stores is just deionized
water, only called distilled water for historical reasons and because
Jenny Johnson wouldn't buy something devilish called "deionized water"
to fill her iron.

cheers

dave
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  #6  
Old 08-11-2003, 11:30 AM
Larry Smith
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Default De-ionizing water


"Charlie Johnson" <[Only registered users see links. ]> wrote in message
news:3KEZa.10266$[Only registered users see links. ].atl.earth link.net...

Distilled water is usually purer than deionized. Deionized often just has
the hardness ions (Ca, Mg, etc) removed, and sodium is substituted.

For your experiments, rain water is likely to be good enough.


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  #7  
Old 08-11-2003, 11:34 AM
Larry Smith
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Default De-ionizing water


"Charlie Johnson" <[Only registered users see links. ]> wrote in message
news:3KEZa.10266$[Only registered users see links. ].atl.earth link.net...

Distilled water is usually purer than deionized. Deionized often just has
the hardness ions (Ca, Mg, etc) removed, and sodium is substituted.

For your experiments, rain water is likely to be good enough.



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  #8  
Old 08-11-2003, 11:34 AM
Larry Smith
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Default De-ionizing water


"Charlie Johnson" <[Only registered users see links. ]> wrote in message
news:3KEZa.10266$[Only registered users see links. ].atl.earth link.net...

Distilled water is usually purer than deionized. Deionized often just has
the hardness ions (Ca, Mg, etc) removed, and sodium is substituted.

For your experiments, rain water is likely to be good enough.



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  #9  
Old 08-11-2003, 02:12 PM
dlzc@aol.com \(formerly\)
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Default De-ionizing water

Dear Larry Smith:

"Larry Smith" <[Only registered users see links. ]> wrote in message
news:3f362c6c_3@newsfeed...
can

The last bit is called "softening", not deionizing. Deionizing means you
have fewer, not different, ions. Exchanging sodium for calcium and
magnesium is called softening.

An exchange medium *is* used to pull this trick off, but the medium is
regenerated a different way.

David A. Smith


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  #10  
Old 08-11-2003, 09:25 PM
Steve Turner
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Default De-ionizing water

"Charlie Johnson" <[Only registered users see links. ]> wrote:


Yes, distilled water would be fine.

Steve Turner

Real address contains worldnet instead of spamnet
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