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non-programmed cell death in eukaryotic plants & prokaryotes

non-programmed cell death in eukaryotic plants & prokaryotes - Cell Biology and Cell Culture

non-programmed cell death in eukaryotic plants & prokaryotes - Cell Biology Forum. Cell Culture Forum. Post and ask questions about cell culturing, cell lysis, cell transfection, cell growth, and cell biology.


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  #1  
Old 01-30-2004, 10:21 PM
Robert Goodman
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Default non-programmed cell death in eukaryotic plants & prokaryotes



I want to teach my Plants & People students about a fundamental fact of
life: death. A cell can reach a point of no return in sickness such that it
must die, death being a permanent condition. In necrotic cell death in
eucaryotic animal cells, there's an unarguably irreversible step -- rupture
of
lysosomes.

However, most plant cells don't have an organelle called a lysosome. One
source tells me they have organelles that do the same in necrosis, it's just
that they're not CALLED lysosomes. That true? If not, is necrosis in
plants akin to the death of procaryotes?

In procaryotes, I can only assume that at some point there's not enough
whatever to pay the "overhead" cost, and that it's like a business that
can't pay its operating expenses -- that it drains itself of the equivalent
of cash (free energy or possibly some other consumable). And at some point
even an infusion of "cash" won't stop liquidation. Am I right? Bacteria
have a cell wall to prevent osmotic lysis, but they'll still lose viability,
and even
in the absence of a cell wall isosmotic medium doesn't make cells immortal.
Yes, you can maintain viability longer in stab or slant medium than in
liquid culture, but it's just a matter of time.

Yes, I know there are pathways leading to sporulation, and apoptosis is a
completely different pathway (or set of pathways) of death that's captured
so much research att'n, but I want to explain why all cells have to keep
paying
a maintenance cost or die.

Robert




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Old 02-01-2004, 05:10 PM
artyw
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Default non-programmed cell death in eukaryotic plants & prokaryotes

"Robert Goodman" <[Only registered users see links. ]> wrote in message news:<bvemb8$s46no$[Only registered users see links. ].uni-berlin.de>...

Perhaps this will help, although it seems that
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Old 02-01-2004, 05:14 PM
artyw
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Default non-programmed cell death in eukaryotic plants & prokaryotes

"Robert Goodman" <[Only registered users see links. ]> wrote in message news:<bvemb8$s46no$[Only registered users see links. ].uni-berlin.de>...
(sorry about the partial post)
Perhaps this will help [Only registered users see links. ]
although they say that "Although this scenario resembles PCD in
mammalian systems, specific illustrations of a functionally conserved
program in plants exhibiting the hallmark characteristics of PCD are
limited and molecular details of this process in plants remain unclear
(9)".

According to the sources that I use in teaching my Biology class
lysosomes are rare in plants. When I get done screwing around in
usenet I will have to prepare my next lecture, which will be on cell
"parts" and methods used to study them. Mebbe I will talk about
plants vs animal cells more this year...
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