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...what determines where a plant can grow?

...what determines where a plant can grow? - Botany Forum

...what determines where a plant can grow? - Botany Forum


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  #1  
Old 07-21-2009, 09:30 PM
Raphanus
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Default ...what determines where a plant can grow?



After checking with local botanists I tried to grow some mesquite
(Prosopis glandulosa) from New Mexico here in South Carolina and they
won't grow. The leaves quickly develop black spots and fall off and
the plant dies. The same for Rhus trilobata.

I ask my botanist friends and they can offer very plausible theories -
"A fungus that requires high humidity attacks them" - but there seems
to be zero experimental data to back up the theories.

Look in Radford, "Manual of the Vascular Flora of the Carolinas" and
you find plants (e.g. Aesculus octandra) that grows in the mountains
but not below. Why? One can find theories galore but very little
proof.

Why is the tree line in the mountains so well defined? Is is the O2
level - or the temperature - or the winds or...?

I would think that in this cultural of debate over global warming, if
a botanist were to ask for (say, ~$50M) to create some green house
climates where these parameters could be explored so that various
theories could be tested, they might get a grant.

I'm surprised that botany isn't more of an experimental science.
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  #2  
Old 07-25-2009, 08:56 AM
Sean Houtman
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Default ...what determines where a plant can grow?

Raphanus <[Only registered users see links. ]> wrote in news:7d5508b0-4f3b-42b3-9056-
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The Prosopis may not do well in your area because it is a phreatophyte, it
grows deep roots, and requires well drained and pretty dry soil. It
probably succumbed to one or another root rots. I am surprised to hear that
the Rhus trilobata didn't do well for you, it grows in a wide range of
conditions here in New Mexico.

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  #3  
Old 07-26-2009, 06:16 PM
Lester Welch
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Default ...what determines where a plant can grow?

On Jul 25, 4:56*am, Sean Houtman <[Only registered users see links. ]> wrote:

Sean,...Thanks for your answer. One out of three Rhus trilobata is
still showing signs of life - so maybe there is hope. All three were
about 10 inch saplings when I received them. Other NM plants
(because of my "roots" {pun intended}) I'm watching are a Pinus edulis
(pinion), a sapling which I planted ~ 10inches tall and is in its
second year and Curcurbita foetidissima (buffalo gourd, grown from
seeds) which is also in its second year. The gourd is in a big pot
but hasn't bloomed yet. Prickly pear cactus and yucca (variety of
species) are native in SC and are very common around my area.

I'm also interested - in retirement - in growing very rare native SC
plants - Echinacea laevigata (smooth purple cone flower) and Ribes
echinellum (spiny gooseberry).

Any thoughts about the chances of the gourd if it remains in the pot?
(20 inches diameter and 20 inches tall)
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  #4  
Old 07-27-2009, 09:14 AM
Sean Houtman
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Default ...what determines where a plant can grow?

Lester Welch <[Only registered users see links. ]> wrote in news:232ea5b1-137f-499b-
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The buffalogourd may take several years to flower, they tend to grow
huge roots, and that little pot isn't going to handle what the plant is
going to try to grow. It might be ok though, but watch out for a tap-
root escaping from a drain hole. You do see a few buffalogourds growing
near water, so I expect that it will survive there. Remember that it is
dioecious, so with only one plant, you will never see gourds. You will
have either a male or a female plant.

Sean



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  #5  
Old 07-28-2009, 09:07 AM
Sean Houtman
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Default ...what determines where a plant can grow?

Lester Welch <[Only registered users see links. ]> wrote in news:0e504997-fc32-4682-
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I'm pretty sure, plants tend to either have fruits on them or not. They
might be polygamodioecious, or sometimes having both flower types.

Sean


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