Go Back   Science Forums Biology Forum Molecular Biology Forum Physics Chemistry Forum > Molecular Research Topics Forum > Animal and Molecular Model Systems > Botany Forum
Register Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Botany Forum Botany Forum


Why do ripe fruits -- especially when canned -- smell bad? -- excluding apples and cantaloupes

Why do ripe fruits -- especially when canned -- smell bad? -- excluding apples and cantaloupes - Botany Forum

Why do ripe fruits -- especially when canned -- smell bad? -- excluding apples and cantaloupes - Botany Forum


Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 07-28-2007, 02:32 AM
Radium
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Why do ripe fruits -- especially when canned -- smell bad? -- excluding apples and cantaloupes



Hi:

I know I've brought this subject up before but I just can't get over
it. I apologize profusely to those who might be annoyed. You may
notice some changes though.

I notice that many fruits [excluding apples & cantaloupes] emit foul
odors when ripe. What chemicals are responsible for this? I've done as
much research as I can on this but not gotten anywhere. This isn't a
homework assignment. I am asking these questions out of personal
interest.

I hate those odors. That why I like to eat apricots, peaches, and
similar fruits when they are sour, hard, and greenish. When sour,
hard, and greenish, most fruits smell pleasant. When they are too
ripe, they become excessively sweet, grossly-soft up and turn mucus
yellow; this is when they start to stink.

What causes those immeasurably-foul odors?

It could not be putricine. Putricine smells like rotting flesh, which
is also a foul odor but totally different from that of ripe fruits. To
my nose, over-ripe fruits don't have a smell that even nearly
resembles rotting flesh. Both are equally bad odors, though.

Its also not ethylene - a chemical used to speed ripening. Ethylene
has a sweet pleasant smell to it. I have smelled it myself in a lab.
It's beautiful.

Butyric acid smells like stinky cheese [including Swiss], smelly feet,
sweaty shirts, dirty socks, neck-sweat, back sweat, filthy scalp and
unwashed hair. So it definitely isn't butyric acid. In fact, since
these foul odors occur after ripening [a process which uses up the
acids]; I doubt that any acid or acidic substance is responsible for
the foul odor of ripe fruits.

I notice the stink especially in canned fruits. Most fresh fruits
don't have as much of a strong stink even when ripe. However, canned
fruits [often dripping in syrup] have an unbearable stench to me.
Maybe it is something to do with the sugar? I don't know. I do know
that it has nothing to do with the metals of the can or the effects of
the metals on the fruit/syrup. Perhaps the ripe substances are more
concentrated in the can, than when fresh.

Why do canned ripe fruits stink more badly than fresh ripe fruits?

Also, it can't be ethanol. I like the smell of ethanol.

I've asked similar questions in science newsgroups, and they think I
have an olfactory perception disorder causing me to perceive odors
differently from other humans. I don't believe this at all.

I've taken smell tests in my organic chemistry lab. I've takes organic
chemistry as a course in my college. Long list of chemicals I've gone
through. Still no answer to the stench of ripe fruits. In addition,
none of the chemicals I sniffed even remotely smell like ripe fruit.

My guess is the stink of ripe fruits is a result of a mixture of
different organic substances, excluding both the following chemicals
and their effects on other chemicals:

1. putricine [or any amines]

2. ethylene [sweet smell]

3. butyric acid [or any acid/acidic substance for that matter]

4. ethanol [sweet smell resembling most alcoholic beverages]

4. chemicals resulting from fungus

5. chemicals resulting from decomposition [including bacterial decay]

6. Hydrocarbons [compounds containing only Carbon and Hydrogen]

7. Alcohols [organic compounds with attached OH hydroxide molecule]

8. Chemicals that specifically result from -- or are affected by --
rancidity

9. Inorganic substances -- such as metals

10. Effects of inorganic substances on organic substances

I have tried tiresomely searching on google but there are no websites
that have an answer to my question.

Also, I've noticed that most ripe fruits do not have to be rotten in
order to give off the foul odors I sense. Simply being ripe causes the
odor.

Any assistance is greatly appreciated.

If this is out of your expertise would you please give me an idea of
who could answer my question?

No offense but please respond with reasonable answers & keep out the
jokes, off-topic nonsense, exaggerations, taunts, insults, and
trivializations. I am really interested in this.


I am 23 years old, free-of-brain-tumors, but have a neurological
disability called Asperger's Syndrome.

I would like to give you some information about my disability. The
reason I am posting this message about Asperger's is to help avoid any
potential misunderstandings [though it's probably too late].

I have been diagnosed with Asperger's Syndrome (AS). AS is a
neurological condition that causes significant impairment in social
interactions. People with AS see the world differently and this can
often bring them in conflict with conventional ways of thinking. They
have difficulty in reading body language, and interpreting subtle
cues. In my situation, I have significant difficulty with natural
conversation, reading social cues, and maintaining eye contact. This
can lead to a great deal of misunderstanding about my intent or my
behavior. For example, I may not always know what to say in social
situations, so I may look away or may not say anything. I also may not
always respond quickly when asked direct questions, but if given time
I am able express my ideas.

On Usenet, the text-equivalent of my disability is probably noticed. I
do apologize profusely, for any inconvenience it causes.

Thank you very much in advance for your understanding, cooperation,
and assistance.


Thanks,

Radium

Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 07-28-2007, 02:47 AM
Mark Thorson
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Why do ripe fruits -- especially when canned -- smell bad? --excluding apples and cantaloupes

Radium wrote:

A couple possibilities you haven't considered are
ethyl acetate and isoamyl acetate.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 07-28-2007, 04:31 AM
Radium
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Why do ripe fruits -- especially when canned -- smell bad? -- excluding apples and cantaloupes

On Jul 27, 7:47 pm, Mark Thorson <[Only registered users see links. ]> wrote:


[Only registered users see links. ]

According to the above link, isoamyl acetate smells like pears or
bananas. Wrong chemical.

[Only registered users see links. ]

According to the above link, ethyl acetate has a pleasant fruity odor.
Again, wrong chemical.

Neither ethyl acetate or isoamyl acetate are responsble for the ripe
fruit odor.

Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 07-28-2007, 04:32 AM
Radium
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Why do ripe fruits -- especially when canned -- smell bad? -- excluding apples and cantaloupes

On Jul 27, 7:47 pm, Mark Thorson <[Only registered users see links. ]> wrote:

Oh and I have three additional chemicals to rule out:

1. Ammonia
2. Urea
3. Sulfides and other sulfur-containing compounds

Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 07-28-2007, 04:48 AM
Mark Thorson
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Why do ripe fruits -- especially when canned -- smell bad? --excluding apples and cantaloupes

Radium wrote:

The OSHA descriptions are how they smell to the rest of us.
Not necessarily you. You'll need to smell them yourself
to determine if they match with what is bothering you.
Pineapple has a lot of ethyl acetate. Bananas have a lot
of isoamyl acetate.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 07-28-2007, 05:18 AM
Billy Rose
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Why do ripe fruits -- especially when canned -- smell bad? -- excluding apples and cantaloupes

In article <1185589960.562570.166630@x40g2000prg.googlegroups .com>,
Radium <[Only registered users see links. ]> wrote:


Wow. Is it that time of year again?

For one who is socially impaired you seem to be very, very lucid. You
have posted this request at least twice before and most responders have
told you that you were mistaken (to put the best possible face on it).
Hopefully, this time you will get the drift, that the rest of us don't
notice, what you seem to notice. Either accept your uniqueness or buzz
off. Sorry for my abruptness, but the question could have been stated
less dramatically and you could have accepted previous responses. You
must have personal friends of whom you could pose this question or have
you burned them out as well?

What do you call a person who does the same thing and expects a
different outcome?
--
Billy
[Only registered users see links. ]
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 07-28-2007, 03:21 PM
Michael Moroney
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Why do ripe fruits -- especially when canned -- smell bad? -- excluding apples and cantaloupes

Radium <[Only registered users see links. ]> writes:



One change I notice that _didn't_ happen is not writing this:


The last half dozen times you asked this, you were told, ripe fruits
don't have an "immeasurably-foul odor" to most people. Most people
find them very pleasant smelling. I'll go as far as to say that you
are probably the only person in the world who finds ripe fruit to have
an "immeasurably-foul odor".

You were also told that, since nobody here has your nose or brain other
than yourself, you're going to have to sample organic chemicals that are
components of fruity odors, such as ethyl acetate to find out which
chemical that smells pleasant to everyone else has this "immeasurably-foul
odor". Nobody else can answer this but yourself.

You can skip such craziness as putricine or whatever. Fruits contain
chemicals that smell good to everyone other than yourself.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 07-28-2007, 06:47 PM
Radium
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Why do ripe fruits -- especially when canned -- smell bad? -- excluding apples and cantaloupes

On Jul 28, 8:21 am, [Only registered users see links. ].spaamtrap.com (Michael Moroney)
wrote:


I've used many of those fruit-flavored air-fresheners. They smell like
paradise. Bananas, mangoes, peaches, strawberry, etc. All those air-
fresheners with fruity-fragrance are just wonderful.

This further increases my confusion and frustration over why ripe
*actual* fruits [excluding apples, pears, honeydew, and canteloupes]
stink so badly -- especially when canned.

Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 07-29-2007, 03:23 AM
Mark Thorson
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Why do ripe fruits -- especially when canned -- smell bad? --excluding apples and cantaloupes

Billy Rose wrote:

President of the United States?
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 07-29-2007, 05:11 AM
Billy Rose
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Why do ripe fruits -- especially when canned -- smell bad? -- excluding apples and cantaloupes

In article <[Only registered users see links. ]>,
Mark Thorson <[Only registered users see links. ]> wrote:


Good call, half credit. No. A psychopath. The President is a sociopath.
--
FB - FFF

Billy
[Only registered users see links. ]
Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
apples , bad , canned , cantaloupes , excluding , fruits , ripe , smell


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 04:35 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2005 - 2012 Molecular Station | All Rights Reserved
Page generated in 0.18036 seconds with 15 queries