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chokecherry flesh processor Re: invention

chokecherry flesh processor Re: invention - Botany Forum

chokecherry flesh processor Re: invention - Botany Forum


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Old 07-13-2006, 08:41 PM
a_plutonium@hotmail.com
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Default chokecherry flesh processor Re: invention




[Only registered users see links. ] wrote:
(most snipped)

While on this topic of invention, and since I am canning alot of
organic fruit, let me tell you of my conclusions on Chokecherry.

If you ever tried to process chokecherry you instantly know the trouble
with it. The fruit pulp or flesh is very tiny and it has a seed. The
seed, I am told has cyanide so I want to avoid seeds and especially
avoid them in the canning of chokecherry.

So for years now I have tried to engineer a means of separating the
seed from the flesh of the cherry. And I have failed except for one
thing. My teeth. Human mouth and teeth are the only chokecherry
workable solution.

The juice of chokecherry, which should be renamed as not chokecherry
but Wild Cherry. I call them WildCherry. But the juice is a beautiful
purple-pinkish color. Almost phosphorescent in color. I am not going so
far as to say glow-in-the-dark color but a color that seems unnatural.
I do not see this color in nature except when processing WildCherry
juice.

Processing WildCherry, my recipe: I collect the fruit. Separate out the
bad ones and clean by immersing in water which helps to separate out
the bad ones. Then I put into a pot and add water and boil. Then I mash
the boiled chokecherries. Then I skim-off the juice which I use in my
applesauce. My applesauce is a mix of apples and chokecherry juice and
a few other berries in season.

I cannot say that chokecherry (Wildcherry) juice is great drinking. It
is better than lime juice but not as good as orange or cranberry or
lemon juice to drink. But Chokecherry juice when mixed with applesauce
makes both of them, the apples and the chokecherry a delicious fruit
compote.

Fruits mixed make great dishes whereas if not mixed are somewhat dull
to the taste. The classic example is pears when by themselves are
so-so, but when you have pears mixed with cream or half-and-half is a
sensation.

With the skimmed off juice that leaves the pot with chokecherry seed
and pulp remaining. So what I do with this residue is sprinkle with a
light coat of sugar and place in the refrigerator overnight. And in the
following days I eat this residue. Of course, obviously I have a nearby
spittoon bucket where I can spit out the numerous seeds.

I hear that some universities and colleges are working to make a
variety of chokecherry to solve this problem of a tiny flesh/pulp. But
I needed a solution here and now. And my solution is to gain the juice
to use with other fruit like applesauce. And then eat the residue using
my mouth and teeth as the flesh separation.

Who knows, maybe future table etiquette will provide a spittoon next to
every seat at the fine dining room table.

Archimedes Plutonium
[Only registered users see links. ]
whole entire Universe is just one big atom
where dots of the electron-dot-cloud are galaxies

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