Go Back   Science Forums Biology Forum Molecular Biology Forum Physics Chemistry Forum > Molecular Research Topics Forum > Animal and Molecular Model Systems > Botany Forum
Register Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Botany Forum Botany Forum


Is there more photosynthesis in the oceans than on dry land?

Is there more photosynthesis in the oceans than on dry land? - Botany Forum

Is there more photosynthesis in the oceans than on dry land? - Botany Forum


Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 06-24-2005, 04:54 AM
Peter Jason
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Is there more photosynthesis in the oceans than on dry land?



Just wondering.


Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 06-24-2005, 07:51 AM
Cereus-validus.....
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Is there more photosynthesis in the oceans than on dry land?

Yes. Only as deep as the light reaches.


"Peter Jason" <[Only registered users see links. ].nz> wrote in message
news:d9g3le$24d6$[Only registered users see links. ].au...


Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 06-24-2005, 12:47 PM
Ivan Kobrinsky
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Is there more photosynthesis in the oceans than on dry land?

Cereus-validus:


In the context it is important to consider that sunlight
only can penetrate about 100 to 200 meters deeply into the
sea. In deeper levels (like in more about 2 400 meters sea
depth) photosynthesis is also manufactured. There are living
bacteria, that - like plants - the light for power production
use completely without daylight.

For this feat they are using completely special light.
Instead of the sun the green sulfur bacteria use the weak
jets of hot sources of the deep sea for their photosynthesis.

The bacteria are thereby the first well-known organisms,
which are capable of photosynthesis without sunlight.

The special at the fact is very now that these bacteria can
live at other athmposphere than ours too.



So our current big question becomes whether photosynthesis also
exists on other planets... do exist on other planets in our
sunsystem, under the most adverse conditions photosynthesis
is possible.

Well, on fact the tiny microbes pointed out that the
"photosynthesis is not limited by any means only to the
surface of our planet"[*]

It is conceivable for example that appropriate bacteria on
the Jupitermond Europe are at the soil under a thick ice
cover assumed liquid seas. The researchers filtered the
bacteria from water tests, which took her in the proximity
of the hydrothermalen sources. As you know certainly, the
majority of the well-known representatives of the Archaea
under most extreme local conditions can exist, e.g. at low
pH or in satisfied salt solutions - or like this way the
microbes live in very high temperatures of approximately
350 degrees Celsius in a "breath-thin gap" between that
cooking hot spring waters and the ice-cold (2 degrees C.)
sea depth.

Their ability to use this extremely weak light of the hot
sources to photosynthesis and thus for power production
they owe to a singular antenna system.

This consists of an extremely sensitive chlorosom-complex,
which catches even the smallest reachable light and it for
the reaction cente of the organism transfers, where then
actual photosynthesis takes place, as Robert Blankenship
of the University of Arizona described.


[*] Have a look at online-before-print version that presents
now the international researcher team in PNAS:
"An obligately photosynthetic bacterial anaerobe from a
deep-sea hydrothermal vent";
[Only registered users see links. ]

Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 06-24-2005, 01:24 PM
Cereus-validus.....
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Is there more photosynthesis in the oceans than on dry land?

My, oh my.

Didn't you wander off-topic into outer space?!!!

If they know how to use spell checking on other planets, why don't you?

Photosynthetic bacteria are still bacteria even though they were once
mistakenly called blue-green algae.

Since the oceans cover more than 70 percent of the earth's surface, the
answer to the original question is still YES.


"Ivan Kobrinsky" <[Only registered users see links. ]> wrote in message
news:1119617254.174168.76730@g43g2000cwa.googlegro ups.com...


Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 06-24-2005, 11:13 PM
Peter Jason
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Is there more photosynthesis in the oceans than on dry land?

All the publicity about the "wicked CO2" levels in the atmosphere may be
redundant if most photosynthesis occures in the oceans, because as the CO2
level increases then so should the phytoplankton levels to compensate for
it. The "lungs' of the earth then are not the Amazon and other forests but
the oceans of the world. Also, the large quantities of CO2 will be locked
up by sea ceatures as carbonate.





"Cereus-validus....." <[Only registered users see links. ]> wrote in message
news:CQTue.4663$[Only registered users see links. ].prodigy.co m...


Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 06-24-2005, 11:33 PM
Ivan Kobrinsky
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Is there more photosynthesis in the oceans than on dry land?

Cereus-validus:


headache?



Have you got what I'm telling you? I doubt that.

Your answer to the original question was simpy wrong.

---<cit>---

| Yes. Only as deep as the light reaches.

---<cit/>---


This statement arouses a wrong impression and misleads the OP.
Second part of your answer "Only as deep the light reaches" suggests
you are speaking about something that's coming from outside, from above
into the sea... - something like sunlight.

Of course in ocean lives more photosynthetic bacteria than on dry land
and of course in ocean develops more photosynthesis than on dry land -
but wrongly, this concept is not limited to the upper 200 meters of
sea levels!

You know, chemo-synthetic bacteria form the basis of the partnerships
into the 1970ies already discovered hot sources of deep sea, by using
the energy of sulfur and methane connections and also for this they
need however oxygen - *and* originates again from the photosynthesis
from the sunlight-through-flooded earth's surface.

Means, without sun no life, therefore the credo of the stone-time
biologists called - nevertheless the scientists could have made the
calculation without the so-called GSB1.

Under this contraction a bacterium was isolated right now, which
operates obviously lively photosynthesis - at the ground of the
sea into 2,400 meters of depth.

The sientists fished the puzzling germ with hydrothermical sources
before the coast of Mexico. The main thing now is that there exists
350 degrees Celsius hot spring water and that in narrow columns
between that 2 degrees Celsius cold sea depth.

As DNA analyses resulted in, GSB1 is related to the green sulfur
bacteria. These micro organisms operate a anoxygene photosynthesis
in such a way specified, whereby they split hydrogen sulfide instead
of water.

But but they still need -> light. As known sunlight penetrates however
only 100 to 200 meters deeply in the water; among them the realm of the
eternal darkness begins.

The scientists hold rather the hydrothermical source themselves as
source of illuminating. Because an extremely weak light within the
*infrared range* - which is invisible for the human eye - for the
photosynthesis could glows here however to be sufficient.

With the electron microscope the researchers found into the light-shy
light-worth Chlorosomen so mentioned, which catches and for the
reaction center of the photosynthesis passes the weak light on quasi
as antenna amplifiers. After reading the the microscope documentation
papers of analysis you'll see these organisms are true masters of the
weak light photosynthesis.

You show that photosynthesis is not only limited to the direct surface
of our planet. In this sense my advice to the Jupitermond Europe, that
is born out of very practical nature: Europe is considered already for
a long time as a hot candidate of extraterrestrial existence forms,
which could have domestic furnished themselves under thick ice tank.

To sun-claimant photosynthesis the heavenly body applied however as too
far. This discovery shows that organisms at places can survive, which
possible we did not consider.

In manner of Jurissic Park we can say now: "the life finds a way"!

Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 06-25-2005, 06:20 AM
Cereus-validus.....
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Is there more photosynthesis in the oceans than on dry land?

Don't know what you're smoking, Ivan.

Your answer has very little to do with the original question.

Too bad you still don't know how to do a spell check, spaceman.

BTW, what color is the sky on YOUR planet?


"Ivan Kobrinsky" <[Only registered users see links. ]> wrote in message
news:1119656019.189449.210840@f14g2000cwb.googlegr oups.com...


Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 06-25-2005, 01:00 PM
Ivan Kobrinsky
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Is there more photosynthesis in the oceans than on dry land?

Cereus-validus:


Looks as if you would have concerned at your intellectual end?


Why so limited? My answer has even only to do with this topic
compared with your lie.

Again:

The further prospects of the science (the point on that your
mind seems to hang remained) represents an substantial addition
fitting in the context since this realization in the measure
changes the outdated conception of the world like it leads your
first statement ad absurdum, in which you still believe.

However you didn't understand the main point yet:
The range of the sunlight doesn't state purely nothing at all
over occurrences or concentration of photosynthesis.

Tell me, why do you mislead the OP in your learn-resistance?


You come too easily from the way, worm.


Clarify first the meaning of sky (in light of your posts, I
strengthens doubt your apprehension), afterwards stop your stupid TOFU.

Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 06-25-2005, 02:50 PM
Cereus-validus.....
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Is there more photosynthesis in the oceans than on dry land?

Hey Ivansky.

Have you met Archie Plutonium?
The two of you have a lot in common!!!

What's the matter, aren't any of your other crew members on the Jupiter 2
talking to you?

Are you worried that there is some sort of mass cover-up conspiracy against
you?

Its time to change your meds, Ivansky.


"Ivan Kobrinsky" <[Only registered users see links. ]> wrote in message
news:1119704448.647916.242830@o13g2000cwo.googlegr oups.com...


Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 06-25-2005, 03:57 PM
dh321@excite.com
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Is there more photosynthesis in the oceans than on dry land?

Estimates of global photosynthesis by NASA, the Intergovernmental Panel
on Climate Change and others are that roughly 50% occurs in the oceans
and 50% occurs on land. I have seen older textbooks with estimates
60/40 both ways so estimates vary. The current 50/50 estimates may
change as more accurate techniques to measure global photosynthesis are
employed.

[Only registered users see links. ]
[Only registered users see links. ]
[Only registered users see links. ]

The oceans are about twice the area of land but ocean photosynthesis is
often lower than on land as the color maps in the following NASA
website indicate:

[Only registered users see links. ]

David R. Hershey

Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
dry , land , oceans , photosynthesis


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
does sea life exist thousands of miles from land in the sea's "pole"? haggard_wisdom Environmental Sciences and Issues 0 07-08-2009 01:17 PM
Which of the following is NOT a benefit of photosynthesis? truckin_90 Biology Forum 0 06-24-2009 10:17 AM
Do Oceans Cause Plate Tectonics? Kon Physics Forum 1 04-01-2008 07:16 PM
Fundamental Breakthrough in Understanding Photosynthesis? Berkeley Brett Botany Forum 0 04-14-2007 01:51 PM
acer platanoides and Rootenone; sunburst locust and blue spruce Archimedes Plutonium Botany Forum 15 05-24-2004 12:51 PM


All times are GMT. The time now is 04:23 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2005 - 2012 Molecular Station | All Rights Reserved
Page generated in 0.18797 seconds with 16 queries