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grafted rootstock

grafted rootstock - Botany Forum

grafted rootstock - Botany Forum


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  #31  
Old 07-03-2004, 02:40 PM
P van Rijckevorsel
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Default flaw in metaphor

> << "Isn't this the Amorphophallus titanum calling the Aristolochia
grandiflora

Iris Cohen <[Only registered users see links. ]> schreef

+ + +
That certainly is closer to the level preferred by the two persons involved!
(i.e. low, close to the ground if not subterranean)
PvR




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  #32  
Old 07-04-2004, 12:19 AM
Iris Cohen
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Default flaw in metaphor

<< That certainly is closer to the level preferred by the two persons involved!
(i.e. low, close to the ground >>

How about this? Monotropa uniflora calls Corallorhiza heterotrophic.

Did you know? In Australia and the Far East there are certain fungi which are
parasitic on certain trees. There are orchids which live off the fungi without
touching the trees, thus preserving their innocent reputation.
Iris,
Central NY, Zone 5a, Sunset Zone 40
"If we see light at the end of the tunnel, It's the light of the oncoming
train."
Robert Lowell (1917-1977)
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  #33  
Old 07-04-2004, 07:43 AM
P van Rijckevorsel
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Default flaw in metaphor

> << That certainly is closer to the level preferred by the two persons
involved! (i.e. low, close to the ground >>

Iris Cohen <[Only registered users see links. ]> schreef

+ + +
No, they attain nothing like that level of sophistication, and they are not
pallid creatures of the night either. How about:

Bellis perennis calling Poa annua common.
PvR






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  #34  
Old 07-04-2004, 05:43 PM
P van Rijckevorsel
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Default flaw in metaphor

or Cocos nucifera calling Couroupita guianensis a menace

[Apparently more people are killed annually by coconuts dropping out of
palms than are killed by sharks]






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  #35  
Old 07-04-2004, 09:45 PM
Iris Cohen
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Default flaw in metaphor

<< or Cocos nucifera calling Couroupita guianensis a menace >>

I'm not that familiar with the cannonball tree. What family is it in? The
flowers are pretty, but I'd hate to have one of those fruits fall on me.
Iris,
Central NY, Zone 5a, Sunset Zone 40
"If we see light at the end of the tunnel, It's the light of the oncoming
train."
Robert Lowell (1917-1977)
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  #36  
Old 07-04-2004, 11:34 PM
Geoff Bryant
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Default flaw in metaphor

It's in the Lecythidaceae, which isn't the best-known of families, though
Barringtonia and Bertholletia are fairly well-known genera.

--
Geoff Bryant
[Only registered users see links. ]


"Iris Cohen" <[Only registered users see links. ]> wrote in message
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  #37  
Old 07-04-2004, 11:56 PM
Cereus-validus
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Default flaw in metaphor

I think you're all cuckoo for cocoa puffs!!!


"Iris Cohen" <[Only registered users see links. ]> wrote in message
news:[Only registered users see links. ].com...


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  #38  
Old 07-05-2004, 06:45 AM
P van Rijckevorsel
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Default flaw in metaphor

<< Couroupita guianensis >>

Iris Cohen <[Only registered users see links. ]> schreef
flowers are pretty, but I'd hate to have one of those fruits fall on me.
Iris,

+ + +
Lecythidaceae are a pantropical family of trees (& shrubs), with a heavy
presence in South America. Actually Lecythidaceae are a fairly interesting
family, and certainly one that is moving more and more into the spotlight.
Probably best known for the large (and very hard) spherical fruits of some
South American representatives it has many interesting features. The flowers
(with all those stamens) led to a placement in or near Myrtaceae in earlier
days, but today it is placed near Ebenaceae (in the very much expanded
Ericales).

Also the family keeps growing, and constantly seems to be absorbing small
neighbouring families. Of these Barringtoniaceae was the biggest, but it was
followed among others by (the grandiosely named) Napoleonaeaceae and
recently Scytopetalaceae.

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