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Bacteria Growth and Inactivation

Bacteria Growth and Inactivation - Biology Forum

Bacteria Growth and Inactivation - Biology Forums. Ask questions and discuss the study of Biology. If you have Biology questions from your homework ask them here!


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Old 09-10-2012, 05:32 PM
Pipette Filler
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Default Bacteria Growth and Inactivation



Hey guys,


I have to ask you some stupid questions, since I'm not a biology expert!
I have to understand bacterial growth and inactivation models respectively ( invented by people like baranyi, mafart, ... ),because I have to do some calculations in the statistic program R.

Could you please explain me what specific maximum growth rate is and whether it could become negative?

Best regards,

Johanna
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Old 09-21-2012, 04:18 AM
Pipette Filler
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Default Re: Bacteria Growth and Inactivation

Hi friends,

Bacteria can be found everywhere, from kitchen counters to bathrooms and in public places like malls and playgrounds. Bacteria can divide rapidly and quickly become numerous, which can be dangerous if the bacteria are disease-causing. Keeping surfaces bacteria-free is sometimes difficult, but there are a few things you can do to keep the bacteria you encounter from making you ill. Some bacteria are useful in a number of ways, while other bad bacteria is detrimental. Bad bacteria gives rise to diseases, such as malaria, tuberculosis, cholera and tetanus, and causes body odor and hair loss. These bacteria need to be controlled or eliminated. Bacteria are present in most habitats on Earth, growing in soil, acidic hot springs, radioactive waste, water, and deep in the Earth's crust, as well as in organic matter and the live bodies of plants and animals, providing outstanding examples of mutualism in the digestive tracts of humans, termites and cockroaches. There are typically 40 million bacterial cells in a gram of soil and a million bacterial cells in a millilitre of fresh water; in all, there are approximately five nonillion (51030) bacteria on Earth, forming a biomass that exceeds that of all plants and animals.

It is not possible to inactive or control all bacteria. The bodies natural resistance mechanisms control unhealthy bacterias in many cases, preventing them from wrecking havoc within the body; but good bacteria also exist within people that help digest food and do other important functions. As a result, destroying all bacteria in the body would be undesirable. The same is true for environmental bacteria. You would not want to destroy it all. Inhibiting microbial growth thus, achieved in one of two ways: select bacteria can be either totally killed, in a process known as bactericide, or the growth of the cells can be stunted severely that called as a bacteriostatic process.

Thanks and Regards,
Stephen Jones
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Old 09-21-2012, 04:21 AM
Pipette Filler
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Default Re: Bacteria Growth and Inactivation

Hi everyone,

Bacteria can be found everywhere, from kitchen counters to bathrooms and in public places like malls and playgrounds. Bacteria can divide rapidly and quickly become numerous, which can be dangerous if the bacteria are disease-causing. Keeping surfaces bacteria-free is sometimes difficult, but there are a few things you can do to keep the bacteria you encounter from making you ill.Some bacteria are useful in a number of ways, while other bad bacteria is detrimental. Bad bacteria gives rise to diseases, such as malaria, tuberculosis, cholera and tetanus, and causes body odor and hair loss. These bacteria need to be controlled or eliminated.Bacteria are present in most habitats on Earth, growing in soil, acidic hot springs, radioactive waste, water, and deep in the Earth's crust, as well as in organic matter and the live bodies of plants and animals, providing outstanding examples of mutualism in the digestive tracts of humans, termites and cockroaches. There are typically 40 million bacterial cells in a gram of soil and a million bacterial cells in a millilitre of fresh water; in all, there are approximately five nonillion (51030) bacteria on Earth, forming a biomass that exceeds that of all plants and animals.

It is not possible to inactive or control all bacteria. The bodies natural resistance mechanisms control unhealthy bacterias in many cases, preventing them from wrecking havoc within the body; but good bacteria also exist within people that help digest food and do other important functions. As a result, destroying all bacteria in the body would be undesirable. The same is true for environmental bacteria. You would not want to destroy it all. Inhibiting microbial growth is thus achieved in one of two ways: select bacteria can be either totally killed, in a process known as bactericide, or the growth of the cells can be stunted severely, in what is called a bacteriostatic process.

Thanks
Stephen Jones
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